How to write your LinkedIn Profile

How to Write Your LinkedIn Profile to Generate Maximum Visibility

Professionals and businesses pay to be able to search the 575 million profiles (260 million active) on LinkedIn, so it makes sense to put time (and maybe money) into writing a LinkedIn profile that will get you found.

I have been writing LinkedIn profiles for nearly four years, knee-deep in the platform that has been rapidly growing since Microsoft purchased it in 2016.

Here are my best practices for writing a LinkedIn profile for maximum visibility:

Focus on Your LinkedIn Headline

There are multiple approaches to take with your LinkedIn headline, but it is one of the most important aspects of your profile.

Your headline is one of the heaviest-weighted items of your LinkedIn profile, so it is important to think through your primary LinkedIn goal and whether your target audience will be searching for you or finding you through inbound marketing (e.g. they see you post because of organic reach or through the post of a mutual connection).

  1. If your target audience will be searching for you — you are hoping to be found by a recruiter or staffing agent or your potential client will be searching for your services — comprise your headline of keywords.
  2. If you expect your target audience to find you via inbound marketing, make sure the first 50-70 characters of your headline will draw them in. Depending on your audience, this may be keywords, but I’ve also seen people write coy or sarcastic headlines that are incredibly effective.
  3. If you are a top-level executive, consider your title and company only. If you are a C-level executive of a Fortune 500 company or are in a specialized industry like finance or medicine, a minimalist headline may be the best approach. Add keywords in your Current Experience or Skills sections.

Write A Summary with A Strategy

Just as there are multiple approaches to take with your LinkedIn headline, there are multiple approaches to take with your LinkedIn summary. The majority of the time, your summary should serve the same purpose as a cover letter: it should summarize your professional journey and your expertise.

If your primary focus on LinkedIn is sales, you may want to promote your product or service using your Summary. A few things to remember with your LinkedIn summary:

  1. Your first three lines should draw in your audience. When someone clicks to view your LinkedIn profile, they will see your banner, headshot, headline, and the first paragraph of your summary (see above). If that first paragraph doesn’t draw them in, they’re more than likely clicking away.
  2. Include keywords: Your summary is heavily weighted for search, so make sure you are including keywords and phrases throughout your copy.
  3. Add two links that support your expertise or business: How links are displayed has changed many times in recent years. Currently, having two links is (in my opinion) the best option because you can see the headline along with the thumbnail. This is much more attractive than 5-6 teeny tiny thumbnails across the bottom of a section.

Make Your Current Experience Section(s) Count

You can have more than one current experience section, and they are heavily weighted for search. If a user with Sales Navigator or Recruiter is using the “Title” field, what you have listed as your current experience headline will be searched for a match.

  1. If you are looking for a job, think through what a recruiter or hiring manager would type into that title field and make sure it is a part of your current experience headline!
  2. If you are unemployed, create a current experience section to position yourself as a consultant. Be creative if you have to, but this serves multiple purposes: it adds valuable keywords to your profile and it fills an unemployment gap.
  3. If you are selling on LinkedIn, make sure you populate your current experience section with relevant keywords and/or services your target audience would search for.
  4. If you are an executive on LinkedIn, include your title first and then add other keywords after that. For example: “CEO of The Best Company | Website Management and Design for Fortune 500 Companies”

Complete Your Skills Section

This is especially important for anyone unemployed or looking to make a job change. LinkedIn Recruiter has a search field for Skills, which recruiters or hiring managers will fill out to narrow a candidate search. LinkedIn job postings also include specific skills ideal candidates should possess.

If possible, use already-established skills. You can type anything you want into the skills section, but it’s best if you use common terms.

Choose what you believe to be your most relevant skills to put in the top three.

Make Your Profile Public

If you are trying to be found on LinkedIn, make it easy. Whether you like it or not, having a headshot and making it visible increases trust.

In fact, LinkedIn users with a profile photo receive:

  • up to 21X more profile views
  • up to 36X more messages
  • up to 9X more connection requests

Other Important LinkedIn Profile Best Practices

  • Make sure each section is linked to the appropriate company page. When you begin to type in the business you work with, the page should populate for you to select.
  • If you have your own business, you must create a company page for your logo to show up on your personal profile!
  • Write articles specifically for LinkedIn or cross-post your articles natively on LinkedIn. This adds more to your LinkedIn profile because your most recent article is prominently displayed in the “Articles & Activity” section!

Any questions I didn’t address? Please ask them in the comments below!

You can also download my free LinkedIn Profile Optimization Checklist!

About Chrissie Wywrot

Chrissie Wywrot is a LinkedIn visibility expert and lead generator working with six- and seven-figure businesses. To learn more about her services, visit her LinkedIn profile or email her at chrissie@chrissiewywrot.com.

LinkedIn lead gen

This is ‘My Right Way’​ for Generating Leads on LinkedIn

“LinkedIn doesn’t actually generate business, though, right?”

You’d be surprised how many times I’ve been asked that question. It jolts me every time, because LinkedIn is my business.

I’m jolted for the opposite reason when people are offended because individuals do generate business through LinkedIn.

The (obvious) bottom line? Generating business via LinkedIn is 100-percent appropriate when it’s done the right way. 

What is the right way?

I am going to articulate my “right way,” which isn’t necessarily another person’s “right way.” I market myself and my clients using a genuine, organic method. I’m not a fan of automated messages, bots to auto-connect, or pitching hard with the first outreach.

I believe in the human touch.

While that way isn’t always the fastest (though sometimes it is, as you’ll read later), it is like building a house on rock instead of sand. When done consistently, the groundwork is laid for regular leads to come in.

My “right way” has generated leads for me — some immediate and some more than a year after the initial connection — and consists of the following actions:

1. Writing An Effective Headline

This is your LinkedIn billboard. 

I have one client who found me through my LinkedIn headline. I had commented on a mutual connection’s post and this client saw that I specialize in “LinkedIn profile optimization and visibility.” It was a need and she reached out.

Your LinkedIn headline is made up of 125 characters with the first 75 visible at all times. That means your headline is hugely valuable when commenting on other people’s posts.

Headline dos and don’ts:

  • DO use SEO-relevant words
  • DON’T fill your first 75 characters with prepositions
  • DO catch the attention of your target within the first 75 characters

2. Having Fun with Outreach

This is part of my “be human” philosophy and why I’m not a fan of auto-connections. When I reach out, I frequently look over his or her profile, noting anything that jumps out.

Sometimes nothing jumps out, and that’s okay!

Other times, I will see a mutual interest, a business name I think is clever, or a particular achievement that impresses me. I mention it when I reach out.

Doing this accomplishes a few things:

  • It humanizes us
  • It catches the attention of the recipient
  • It shows the recipient you took care in reaching out

I have received immediate leads after sending a whimsical, off-the-cuff reach-out. First, I caught the attention of the recipient with my note, and, second, had the information in place within my headline and profile to lead them through the initial phase of my sales process.

3. Engaging Consistently

I know I’m not one of the “big dogs” with this statistic (I will get there!), but I receive – on average – between 150-250 profile views per week. At least once per month, I spike between 400-500 profile views per week.

I generate those profile views by consistently engaging on LinkedIn, and by having a keyword-heavy headline and profile that pulls me up in search.

“Going down the rabbit hole,” as I call it, also helps you as it pertains to the algorithm (the more you engage, the better your posts do), and puts your headline in front of more people. I see a lot of value in engaging on LinkedIn, even for those who are crazy-busy influencers or business owners (seemingly) without the time to do so. 

The key question: do you have enough time to generate leads for your business?

If a potential client says they have zero time to respond to comments or private messages within LinkedIn, I will suggest they work with someone else.

Lending your genuine expertise to your LinkedIn network is what will sell you – generic comments from someone responding on your behalf just won’t cut it.

The (Obvious) Bottom Line

I mentioned earlier that the (obvious) bottom line is that generating business on LinkedIn is 100-percent appropriate when done the right way. Remember that this is my right way, and that others are effective using other methods. 

If you are wondering whether my methods will work well for you, check out the following four categories and see if you fit into one of them:

THE INFLUENCER: Someone with a significant audience and following who has not yet taken advantage of LinkedIn and what it has to offer. These individuals can get a huge boost simply by optimizing their profiles. If they are sought after on other channels, they will certainly gain visibility by optimizing on Google-friendly LinkedIn.

THE NICHE: Someone with a B2B that is one of the first of its kind, or with a business type that doesn’t yet have a significant presence on LinkedIn. In addition to profile optimization (always the first step), this person can develop a defined strategy that will boost him or her to influencer status. With that will come more leads in less time, and potential business partnerships.

PLENTY-OF-TIME: Someone with a stable, successful six-figure-or-more B2B, with no fear of losing clients or incoming leads in the near future. An optimized profile and marketing strategy can build a funnel for this person in 3-6 months, depending on the sales cycle for the business. Personalized connection requests will add the right people to spread awareness and generate leads.

AMAZING CONTENT: Someone who is posting incredible things on LinkedIn … but no one is seeing those posts! After optimizing their profile (yes, it’s always the first step) and making — more than likely — small adjustments to their posts, their content will be seen by more people.

These four categories are my jam. Anyone who falls into one of them will generate traction on LinkedIn, often generating leads right away when working with me.

If you are interested in learning more, reach out to me on LinkedIn or book a call!

About Chrissie Wywrot

Chrissie Wywrot is a LinkedIn visibility expert and lead generator working with six- and seven-figure businesses. To learn more about her services, visit her LinkedIn profile or email her at chrissie@chrissiewywrot.com.

Knowing This Is a Gateway to LinkedIn Success

When it comes to succeeding on LinkedIn, there is one rule: you must know what LinkedIn is looking to accomplish as a business.

It’s easy to forget that LinkedIn is, in fact, a business. We create our personal profile and business page and get lost in believing we own that space.

But we don’t. 

It’s borrowed land, and LinkedIn is a business trying to turn a profit. No, it isn’t on LinkedIn’s agenda to make sure you can generate leads or have maximum visibility. That’s why it’s critical to know what is on LinkedIn’s agenda.

Now, you could do that yourself by paying attention to the news wire and spending enough time on LinkedIn to work out the algorithm by yourself … or you can read articles like this.

These are my top priorities based on many hours using LinkedIn:

1. Video

When LinkedIn (or any social media platform) rolls out a new feature, that is prime time to jump all over it. 

LinkedIn is in the process of rolling out LinkedIn Live, a video streaming tool. Even if this feature isn’t available to the masses in its beta form, it does show that LinkedIn is hoping to be a bigger player in video.

We can deduce that, if LinkedIn is hoping to be a bigger player in video, posts with video should perform well.

2. Conversation

LinkedIn nerds like me spend hours upon hours on the platform and, therefore, can make calculated assumptions about the company’s objectives through the behavior of the algorithm.

One thing is certain: LinkedIn wants conversation.

Where native news articles used to be the go-to for content creators for maximum visibility, now it’s creating “mini blog posts” within the news feed. 

The following approaches work well within LinkedIn posts:

  • Tell a story. Think of your posts as sitcoms – have a clear beginning, middle, and end.
  • Ask a question. We all love to talk about ourselves. Ask a question within the first line of the post (so users see it without having to click) and watch answers roll in.
  • Broadcast a connection. LinkedIn loves photos with faces, especially when they are casual, meet-up pictures. Make sure you tag people and place for even more reach.

3. Articles

Articles aren’t getting anywhere near the reach they used to, but that doesn’t mean they’re useless. 

Far from it, in fact.

Articles generate inbound marketing. When someone sees you “out and about” on LinkedIn, the first thing they will do is click to visit your profile. The most recent article you’ve written holds a prominent spot on your profile with a link to access your full library. 

Also, Google crawls LinkedIn for content, making everything you write relevant fo search engine optimization (SEO). Give it a test run and type in your name in the Google search bar. Your LinkedIn profile is more than likely one of the top five links.

Maintain An Open Mind

Even though these are the rules today it’s important to know that they are ever-changing. All it takes is another algorithm shift or new product release to turn these rules upside down.

I am constantly checking on the algorithm by doing what we aren’t supposed to do (e.g. adding links to posts, sharing articles) to see if anything has changed.

To keep up with what I uncover, make sure you follow me here on LinkedIn or visit my website, chrissiewywrot.com.

About Chrissie Wywrot

Chrissie Wywrot is a LinkedIn visibility expert and lead generator working with six- and seven-figure businesses. To learn more about her services, visit her LinkedIn profile or email her at chrissie@chrissiewywrot.com.

Photo credit: @darby on Twenty20

The Secret to Achieving LinkedIn Visibility

“LinkedIn is so overwhelming to me.”

I hear that from many clients, colleagues, and friends who don’t know where to start when it comes to LinkedIn. How does being on the platform turn into a new job, sales, or key networking connections?

The thing to know about social media networks – LinkedIn included – is that they are always evolving. What is true in April may not be true in October. It’s important to stay on top of social media trends, which most professionals (understandably) don’t have time for.

That’s where people like me come in.

Let me walk you through the secret to achieving LinkedIn visibility as things are today – August 12, 2018.

1. Stop Posting Article Links

Posting an article link is the fastest way to get next to no traction on LinkedIn.

The platform is trying to generate conversation between users, which means any posts with metadata – the image, title, and summary that comes with including a link – will quickly die in the newsfeed. (I will, however, be thrilled if this post defies this rule.)

That being said, producing articles is still important for inbound marketing. When someone clicks through to view your profile, they will see the most recent article you’ve written toward the top. I recommend posting articles at least monthly.

2. Generate Thought-Provoking Conversation

LinkedIn is doing a great thing allowing organic engagement to develop. Facebook has all but halted any chance of organic reach, forcing businesses to invest in the platform’s robust advertising tools if they want any traction at all.

If you can generate engagement (likes, comments, and shares) on LinkedIn, your posts will gain traction in the newsfeed. If you have an optimized headline and LinkedIn profile, visibility should result in business and valuable connection requests.

What does it look like to generate thought-provoking conversation?

I recommend staying true to your personality and what interests you. I love sparking conversations like the one below, which generated nearly 6,000 views.

Also stay true to your personality. If you have a great sense of humor, leverage it. Genuine communication will resonate through the computer or smartphone screen.

This post came to me while viewing the stats of my profile and took off, generating 66 likes, 47 comments, and nearly 11,000 views. I had people reaching out to me in private messages and connection requests referencing the “office boy” post.

Don’t be afraid to test things out: subject, tone, type of post.

3. Leverage Hashtags

Remember LinkedIn Pulse? If you don’t, it was LinkedIn’s curated content platform. If you were picked up by LinkedIn Pulse, your article views would skyrocket.

The equivalent of that system now is hashtags, which LinkedIn recently rolled out in a way that is starting to stick. LinkedIn has recommended including hashtags in posts for awhile, but one could never be quite sure what that accomplished.

Now they’ve made it an actual thing. You can follow specific hashtags to see posts that reference them in your newsfeed and you can include them in your posts to extend their reach. I recommend using as many (relevant) hashtags as possible whenever you post.

4. Go Down the LinkedIn Rabbit Hole

Yes, I’m telling you to throw best productivity practices out the window and allow yourself to travel deep into the abyss of mindlessly perusing social media.

Here’s the thing: LinkedIn will penalize your posts if you aren’t commenting on other people’s posts. If you don’t believe me, try it. Post daily to LinkedIn; use hashtags, don’t include a link, and try to generate engagement. If you don’t engage other people’s posts during that time, your reach will be limited.

Then change things up and start commenting on other people’s posts. Get into back-and-forth conversations with people. Say more than, “Great post!” Actually engage.

The visibility of your posts will increase. Believe me. Take a look at my profile as an example. The trends of people looking at my profile ebb and flow with me going down the LinkedIn rabbit hole to engage with others.

5. Change Up Your Content

Finally, change up your content. In other words, don’t be one-note. Allow yourself to explore different subjects, different mediums (video vs. posing a question vs. an image), and different times of the day. Tag people because they really would like to read the content, not to bait them into commenting.

As you test things out, you’ll find a rhythm that works for you and your visibility will soar. Then it’s all up to you to sell and network to your heart’s content.

About Chrissie Wywrot

Chrissie Wywrot is a B2B lead generator and personal brand strategist who works with passionate entrepreneurs and professional athletes. To learn more about her services, visit her LinkedIn profile or email her at chrissie@chrissiewywrot.com.