market your business

The Fortune is in the Focus: How to Properly Market Your Business

Why do some marketing campaigns succeed while others fail? The fortune is in the focus.

Throwing spaghetti against the wall to see if it will stick may ultimately get you to your goal, but it will be a painful process. Having a clear idea of what you are looking to achieve so you can map your route from Point A to Point B is significantly more efficient.

To get started, we’ll map out three necessary elements of a marketing campaign. Let’s take a look at a fictional business — a brick-and-mortar candy shop — as a way to illustrate each point.

Know Your Goal

What is the goal of this candy shop? Don’t jump the gun! Yes, the goal is entice individuals to purchase candy, but let’s get even more specific than that.

As a content marketing effort, the company writes a blog post about their love for Halloween. The title and social media messaging are critical to converting passive readers of that blog post into attentive, potential customers.

For example, a generic title or social media post may read, “Candy Corner’s Love of Halloween Has Lasted A Decade.” That line is accurate, but it doesn’t speak to the business focus, which is to draw people to the store.

A more focused title or post may read, “Candy Corner is a Must-Stop Shop on Halloween.”

The story itself is the same in both examples, but the messaging in the focused post is specifically targeted toward the business goal.

Know Your Worth

What is it you are offering your customers or clients? Be careful with this one because it isn’t always what you believe to be the obvious answer.

In our candy store example, your knee-jerk response may be that this particular business is offering customers candy. Easy enough, right?

While that may be true, promoting “candy” as the reason customers should purchase won’t set this business apart from others. The key is to look at the differentiating factors between this business and the competition.

A few things to consider:

  • How many stores are there specifically dedicated to candy nowadays? Perhaps this business is providing an experience to customers beyond walking into a chain store to purchase candy.
  • What kind of variety exists within this candy store? More than likely, a candy store will have a much wider selection than a grocery store.
  • Is the product of higher quality than packaged candy? Maybe this store makes their own candy or chocolate without preservatives.

Understanding what sets your business apart from the competition is critical to an effective marketing campaign.

Know Your Audience

You must get inside the heads of your target customers to know why they are the right people to buy from you. Making this a bit more tricky, you may have multiple audiences you are targeting at any given time.

For our fictional candy store, there would be multiple audiences:

  • Grandparents may come to the store because they want to have a fun day out with grandchildren and provide them something special. Messaging may speak to “spoiling” them.
  • Parents may appreciate the higher quality of candy. Messaging may speak to ingredients, fewer preservatives, or better taste.
  • Older individuals may have a sense of nostalgia going to a candy store as they did when they were younger. Messaging can speak to re-living their youth.
  • Children are an obvious target audience, but this is a great example a need for a different marketing strategy. How much money will children have and how will they get to your store? While they will consume your product, they may not be one of your primary targets.

The audience you speak to will depend on which is the most likely to convert. You may start with one group and then add another once you’ve found success with the first.

It’s important that you don’t try to speak to everyone at once. The more specific you are with your targeting, the better the results. It may seem counter-intuitive, but it’s true that when you try to speak to everyone, you ultimately speak to no one.

How do you focus your marketing campaigns? Where do you start and how do you come up with your messaging?

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