LinkedIn vs. Facebook

LinkedIn vs. Facebook: Which is Better for Your Business?

It’s LinkedIn vs. Facebook … which social media platform is better for your business? The answer may surprise you.

While the two platforms look alike (and many on LinkedIn complain Facebook-type posts are “taking over”), they each have distinctive drawbacks and benefits.

Let’s explore them, shall we?

B2B vs. B2C

Whether you’re business-to-business (B2B) or business-to-consumer (B2C) may impact which platform you choose. LinkedIn is set up for B2B engagement while Facebook is set up for B2C. There are, however, circumstances where the scenarios flip. The key is understanding why your audience is on either platform.

Let’s say, for example, you are targeting individuals working with a network marketing company. Even though that is a B2B initiative, Facebook would be an ideal spot to find your target since many network marketers use Facebook as away to drive business.

If you are a B2C business but your target is specific to a professional segment, however, LinkedIn may work for you. A product for executives or service for business travelers are two examples.

Advertising

If you’re looking to leverage paid advertising for your product or service, it’s important to know the differences between Facebook and LinkedIn.

Facebook has a more robust platform and is far cheaper than LinkedIn. You can re-target using Facebook ads by implementing a pixel on your website and creating custom audiences of those who clicked through to earlier ads.

You can also upload your email list to Facebook, target those individuals who already like your page (and their friends), or those who have engaged with your posts.

Where LinkedIn edges out Facebook is in the B2B space. If you’re pushing an ad to all C-level employees or you’re selling a big ticket business item, LinkedIn may be a better option.

The thing to know with LinkedIn advertising is that it’s much more expensive ($3-5 per click) than Facebook, so you want to have a specific objective before you give it a try.

The News Feed

LinkedIn is a much better platform for organic engagement since it doesn’t carry the dreaded Facebook algorithm. Being seen on LinkedIn is far easier (at least for now) with organic posts, though the platform did make more difficult to gain traction with native posts.

If you’re just starting on Facebook, you can expect to leverage advertising for initial likes on your page unless you have a large, relevant network to leverage. One rule applies for both platforms: create content users engage with (like, share, comment) and it will be seen.

Search

One significant benefit for businesses on LinkedIn over Facebook is the search function. This comes down to the way people use LinkedIn compared to Facebook and the function itself.

LinkedIn’s search function is enough of a reason to have an optimized profile for yourself and your team members, especially if you are a B2B. Let’s say I’m looking for a business coach. Where am I likely to search? LinkedIn would be my No. 1 spot, without question.

Not only do I find a variety of coaches I can choose from, I can see if I have any common connections to attain a reference or get an introduction.

Local vs. Online

Local businesses must be on Facebook without question, whether you’re a B2B or B2C.

Since you’re local, you can leverage your personal network to extend the reach of your business page. This shouldn’t be done all the time (you don’t want to drive your personal network crazy), but in calculated spots (Think a local coffee shop asking friends to share photos on their personal profiles).

Facebook advertising is also ideal for local businesses. Just about everyone enters where they live into their personal profile, making it a cakewalk to target potential customers at a low cost.

There is still a benefit to being on LinkedIn as a local business, but being on Facebook is a must.

Final Thoughts

Deciding where to focus your online marketing attention can be a tough decision: do you go with what’s most popular or what you know best?

The answer is neither: you go with the best fit for your business. Facebook or LinkedIn will be a fit for your business … it’s just a matter of finding out if it’s one, the other, or both.

Hopefully this helped you narrow things down. If you’re looking for further customized help, you can reach out for a one-hour strategy session or a LinkedIn Profile Optimization!

warm leads

How to Warm Up Your Audience Before Pitching Your Services

I am a huge proponent of personalizing your message for your target audience, but this is even more important for consultants.

Consultants sell advice. It’s rare someone will pay a consultant for advice when they don’t know them from Adam. That’s why it’s critical to transition cold traffic — people who don’t know you — to warm leads before attempting to sell.

There are a number of ways to convert cold traffic into warm leads as a consultant.

Here is a three-step guide:

Step 1: Create Content

Since consultants are selling advice, content is critical because it showcases knowledge. Get into the heads of your target audience and come up with problems they need to solve.

It’s important to think basic for a number of reasons.

First, you will appeal to a broader audience when you start slow. As an expert in your field, it’s easy to take for granted what your audience doesn’t know.

Second, providing something simple allows your audience to test your advice and see tangible results. If what you’re suggesting is too complex, they will get lost in it and not see what your advice can do for them.

Noteworthy Advice

  • You may worry about giving away too much because then your audience won’t need to pay you. The opposite is true! When you give away your best stuff, people will flock to you for customized services.
  • Your content medium is just as important as your content. Again, get into the heads of those within your target audience and figure out how they best ingest content. It could be a blog, video, infographic, or podcast.

Step 2: Promote and Track

While it’s useful to have people reading, watching, or listening to your content because they’re getting to know you, it’s critical to track them.

I prefer a method recently mentioned in an interview between Jocelyn Sams of Flipped Lifestyle and Natalie Eckdahl of the BizChix Podcast: install a Facebook pixel on your website so you can target ads toward those who engage your content.

This method works twofold: first, it helps you grow your business Facebook page, which is difficult to do without paid advertising. Second, it leverages the most robust advertising medium available to reach your target audience.

You can promote your content on any medium — Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube — as long as traffic is coming to your website.

Step 3: Retarget to Warm LEADS

Your next step is to create a custom audience within Facebook.

  • Visit your audiences page within Facebook Business Manager.
  • Go to Create Audience — Custom Audience — Website Traffic.
  • From there, you can target anyone who has visited your website within a certain number of days.

This custom audience is valuable because we know they have been exposed to you and what you provide. Now you can target this audience with a bigger ask. Maybe you provide a resource and ask people to give their email address in exchange or go right to promoting your paid service.

It takes 6-8 touchpoints to generate a viable sales lead, depending on who you ask, so you may not get sales right away when you retarget to this audience.

The key is to understand exactly how you want people to get from knowing nothing about you to wanting to buy from you. This process — taking the audience from cold to warm — is only the beginning.

Final Thoughts

The number of steps it will take for cold traffic to buy from you depends on your content, audience, and service. It may be easier for a marketing consultant to convert than a fitness consultant, for example, since the latter is more personal.

The key is be organized, keep track of analytics, and refine until you get it right.

target audience

Get to Know Your Target Audience’s Behavior for Social Media Success

Social media is incredibly simple. All you have to do is sign up for an account, type in your message, and hit send. Customers or clients will flock, right?

Wrong.

One of the biggest misconceptions about social media is its simplicity. The fact that your 13-year-old nephew knows how to navigate Facebook leads you to believe you should be able to make it work for your business without batting an eyelash. Unfortunately, that’s where a lot of business owners get tripped up.

Just because you have a successful, six-figure business off of social media, doesn’t mean it will be an automatic success on social media.

Here are some important questions to ask yourself if you’re struggling to get your business humming on social media:

Where Is Your Target Audience Spending its Time?

When you’re launching your business, it’s tempting to think of the key social media players — Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest — and believe you have to have a presence on each of them. If your target audience isn’t there, though, you won’t get much traction.

It’s also important to know why they’re spending their time there. If you’re targeting school teachers, for example, you might immediately think of Pinterest as a platform you should invest in. If you’re targeting them because you offer professional development courses, however, LinkedIn or Twitter may actually be better options.

You can’t just think of where your target audience is hanging out, you must also consider why.

How Will Your Clients or Customers Find You?

Map out your customer’s or client’s frame of mind to best understand where you should be focusing your attention.

Let’s go back to our teacher example. You offer professional development courses for teachers. You’ve been putting your efforts into Pinterest with no luck, so you do a little digging. It turns out your target audience is on Pinterest … but they’re using the platform to find lesson plan ideas and DIY projects.

What should you do?

  1. Change the approach: Since your target audience likes DIY projects, what if you created DIY professional development? You could offer printouts or forms they could fill out themselves, then link to additional information (i.e. course materials) on your website.
  2. Change the platform: Maybe Pinterest isn’t the right platform for what you offer, even though your target audience is there. Shift focus to a platform that fosters networking and professional development like Twitter or LinkedIn.
  3. Change the audience: The audience you typically go after may not respond on Pinterest, but perhaps a different audience on Pinterest will. Maybe school administrators use Pinterest to find professional development materials for their teachers.

How does Your Target Audience communicate?

Just because something works on a billboard doesn’t mean it will work on Facebook or Twitter. Each social media platform exists to fill a specific communication need.

I may spend time on Twitter while I’m watching a TV show. Facebook is where I share family photos and engage within communities I’m a part of. I enjoy YouTube to watch hysterical spoof videos. Pinterest is where I find recipes.

Your audience may spend time on each of these platforms for entirely different reasons. It’s important to get inside the heads of your avatar and understand why they enjoy Facebook, Snapchat, or LinkedIn.

That’s the key to understanding how you should be communicating.

How Does the Platform Work?

Each social media platform has it’s own tips and tricks.

  • If you’re posting to Facebook, you better be aware of the dreaded algorithm.
  • Incorporate relevant hashtags on Twitter (you can research on hashtagify.me).
  • LinkedIn prefers longer posts within it’s publisher.
  • Instagram only allows one dynamic link for each account.
  • The list goes on and on …

Final Thoughts

You may take a look at this list and decide it isn’t worth the trouble – you’d rather hire someone. If that’s the case, reach out to me and we can schedule a discovery call — I’d be happy to do the heavy lifting for you!

I am also gauging interest for 60-minute social media strategy sessions! If that’s something you’re interested in, please let me know!