marketing strategy

What Is the Best Way to Market Your Business?

There are countless tools at your fingertips when it comes to promoting your business online. From email marketing to social media, you could literally come up with dozens of ways to market your product or service.

The million dollar question is: which do you choose?

In my experience, I see business owners go with what is familiar. Maybe they have heard of Facebook ads and, therefore, believe that is the way to go. They think they “should” be on Twitter or “should” build an email list.

While those options may end up being the best course to take, that approach is backwards. Uncovering an ideal marketing plan is done in a series of steps starting, most importantly, with business goals.

What are you trying to accomplish?

It’s amazing how easy it is to overlook this question, but it is the most important to answer. Articulate for yourself what you are trying to achieve and remember that you may have more than one goal.

Outline the what and the who.

Example of professional with a single goal:

  • I want to sell my services as a virtual assistant to solo entrepreneurs making at least $100,000 per year.

Example of a professional with multiple goals:

  • I want individuals who want to be public speakers to purchase coaching packages from me.
  • I want to establish myself as an influencer in the area of public speaking.

Why will others want what you are selling?

Dig into the motivation of others to purchase your product or service. If your ideal client or customer needs a lot of convincing, your strategy will include more touchpoints.

Another factor is trust. If you are selling coaching services, for example, your client will need to know you before purchasing. Your marketing strategy will be heavy from a content standpoint: blog posts, podcast interviews, videos, etc.

If, on the other hand, you are selling a service with a black-and-white need — lawn service, for example — trust isn’t as big of a factor. You can simply identify the best way to reach individuals or businesses that need your services and get in front of them with your call to action.

Will your ideal client or customer be looking for you?

This will greatly impact your marketing strategy. If clients or customers are actively searching for what you’re selling, Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is critical for your website and other platforms like LinkedIn or YouTube.

If they aren’t, you may want to look into lead generation or paid advertising and your marketing strategy will have to nurture your audience from cold to customer.

How can you best showcase the benefit of working with you?

Your value is critical to conversion. If you are selling a service, look to promote your expertise in a way that puts you in the best light.

Do you light up when you talk about what you do? Make videos or pitch yourself as an on-camera or podcast interview. Are you a strong writer? Write blog posts.

Think about how your audience will want to learn more about you. Are you targeting people who are rarely in front of a computer? Try direct reach-outs and ask for a phone call.

Is your ideal client a mom who is always checking Facebook? Put together Facebook ads or do live videos.

Need additional help?

This is just a start to putting together your marketing strategy. There are many other factors involved to determine the best plan of action.

If you are feeling overwhelmed at the thought of putting your own marketing plan together, reach out to me for help. We will go over all of these questions and more. Then I will provide you with a detailed marketing plan you can execute yourself or hire someone to execute.

Email chrissie@chrissiewywrot.com or visit my marketing strategy page!

genuine and trustworthy

Dollars Flow to the Genuine and Trustworthy

Passion is a way of life and business for me. One thing I’m very passionate about is being genuine and trustworthy as an entrepreneur.

Businesses run by honest, passionate people are the ones others want to work for and with. I only work with clients who are genuine and trustworthy and who want to make a difference in the lives of their clients or customers.

Beyond operating that way within a business, though, is marketing oneself the same way in order to move a business forward. This isn’t always the sexiest approach, because it can take time to plant roots as an unknown in a digital space, but it will ultimately bring the best return.

Once individuals know, like, and trust you, they will give you their business — it’s that simple. It’s important, however, to follow specific guidelines:

1. Make Sure You’re Marketing to the Right People

While it’s fantastic to generate engagement in the digital space, it’s meaningless if those you’re engaging with have zero desire to buy from you. Don’t fall into the trap of reaching out to an audience that ingests your content, but doesn’t need your services.

Here’s an example:

Let’s say you build websites and you’re trying to drum up business through social media. You publish tips and tricks as a way to generate engagement and, hopefully, business. The only problem is that your tips and tricks are attracting a do-it-yourself audience that loves your content, but doesn’t need your services.

If, on the other hand, you publish “10 questions to ask of your potential website developer,” you may attract a crowd looking for a website developer instead of looking to develop it themselves. And, going back to our original point, you will show that you are caring and trustworthy by helping this audience find the right fit.

2. Make Sure You’re GENERATING Enough Exposure

Just because you build it, doesn’t mean they will come. Producing fantastic content is only the first step. Next, you need to get that content in front of the right people by working with a social media specialist to dig into the nuances of each platform to get the most out of them.

Here are a few of my articles that may help:

Beyond that is a need for general SEO, or search engine optimization. Writing quality content is one thing; you also need to structure that content within your website so search engines read it and pull out relevant keywords.

One of my more popular posts is, “Stop Thinking SEO is Something You Should Save for a Rainy Day.” Basic SEO is simple and can make all the difference between potential clients finding you and finding someone else instead.

3. Make Sure You’re Saying Enough

As I mentioned before, I only work with awesome, genuine, and trustworthy clients. One of the things I do for them is connect the dots between who they are and what they’re broadcasting to the world.

Too often, amazing, talented entrepreneurs are selling themselves short by not conveying the incredible qualities they possess. These qualities are often referred to as “soft skills” and aren’t as outwardly valued in our culture as hard skills.

For consultants especially, these soft skills are everything. Even if your “it factor” has nothing to do with soft skills, the piece that will push people over the edge to want to hire you is often your engaging personality, ability to problem-solve, or genuine desire to want to help.

Make sure what makes you unique is being broadcast along with your deliverables.

Final Thoughts

Digital noise bombards potential clients and customers with endless messages and pitches. You want to be the person they turn to with their questions and — more importantly — their jobs.

Do that by conveying your genuine willingness to help and take care of their businesses, and you will be well on your way.

target audience

Don’t Worry About the Gurus … Just Do You

Back when I was still finding my way as an entrepreneur, I was between gigs and needed to bring in some cash. I opted for a multi-level marketing business, knowing that if I liked the products enough, I could sell them.

I was right, but felt pressure from the higher ups to recruit other sellers. It wasn’t in my DNA, though … I don’t like cold calls, gimmicks, lame pitches, etc. Against my better judgment, I tried it. What happened was exactly what I suspected: I pissed people off, didn’t recruit anyone, and felt the wrath of being something other than myself.

It taught me a valuable lesson: stay true to me, regardless of outside pressure.

Let Me Be Vulnerable For A Second …

One of my “superpowers” in business is networking. I’m good at it both online and in person. I love engaging with others and digging into what makes them tick. I’m passionate about what I do and that translates into my business conversations.

On the flip side of that is appealing to the masses – converting cold traffic into warm traffic into paying customers. I admit that I’ve allowed myself to fall into the same trap I fell into as a multi-level marketer: listening to the gurus instead of my gut.

I’ve heard some amazing advice: write practical tips my target audience is looking for, make my website about my audience instead of myself, “niche down” to appeal to my “avatar.” While I’ve generated traffic using these methods, my leads continue to come through referrals and through the two platforms I leverage my networking prowess: Twitter and LinkedIn.

The moral of the story? What makes me unique — networking and engagement — is what sells, not conforming to a set of practical tips.

Getting That Wake-Up Call

I owe my most recent wake-up call to a Freelance Transformation podcast episode with Khierstyn Ross. She confessed to host Matt Inglot that she hates pitching herself and that her business method is to network her ass off in the right places and establish herself as the go-to person for crowdfunding.

Like Khierstyn, I hate pitching to cold traffic, though I understand the value for those who are amazing at it (and in the right industry for it).

Khierstyn also talked about setting herself apart from the competition instead of blending in with all of the other Internet marketers. There are countless “social media managers” and “Internet marketers,” so good luck standing out from the crowd, she said.

That statement really resonated with me. I’d attempted to customize my website to my target audience, ultimately losing the part of my site that sells: me.

Embrace What You’re About

As entrepreneurs, it’s critical to embrace what makes us unique.

I love working with passionate people who want to make a difference in the world, whether it’s through education, fitness, health, or some other means. I have to work with people like this. Someone simply out to generate dollars at any and all costs is not my ideal client.

I dig into and ultimately embody the passion of my clients and work to convey it in the clearest possible way to those they want to help. It drives me as an entrepreneur to build those connections for my clients and see how they, in turn, can help others.

That’s what I’m passionate about.

Now — don’t get me wrong — I also nerd out over analytics and Facebook ads and breaking down the nuances of social media and content, but it’s not what sets me apart from other digital marketers.

What sets me apart is my drive to make a difference.

The Moral of the Story

So, why am I writing all this? I’m hoping my experience will help you dig deep into what sets you apart from the competition. I know from firsthand experience that the talents we so easily bestow upon others are hard to use with ourselves. We are too close to our own businesses.

Uncover what you are passionate about and what makes you unique — that is the reason people will want to work with you or hire you to be their consultant. It’s your “superpower” so to speak.

It doesn’t matter if you’re a digital marketing strategist, a fitness consultant, or an online coach: if you are someone passionate about helping others, it’s that passion that will result in growing your business.

Now it’s just a matter of conveying that passion in the right way.

Facebook pixel

What is the Facebook Pixel and Why Do You Need It?

I’ve had a number of entertaining conversations around the “Facebook pixel.” For those of us in digital marketing, it is an exciting snippet of code that unlocks a marketer’s dream of demographics, re-targeting, and warm leads.

For those of you who are not in digital marketing, conversation around the Facebook Pixel probably sounds like the teacher in Charlie Brown Christmas.

I’m going to do my best to explain the benefits of the Facebook pixel without getting too nerdy. I’ll probably have to get a little nerdy, though … I love this stuff!

1. Implementation

First thing’s first: how do you get this “Facebook pixel?”

It’s a short string of code that you paste into the header of your website. If you aren’t sure how to do that, whoever manages your website will understand.

You can also visit the Facebook Pixel help guide.

2. Facebook Pixel Function

What the pixel does is track everyone who visits your website so you can market to those people on Facebook. Think of it as going to a water park and getting your hand stamped. Once you’ve been to the water park, you’re branded. That’s what it’s like to visit a website that has the Facebook pixel implemented.

The beauty of this is that it allows you to specifically target those people with your Facebook ads. As a consultant, your highest likelihood of getting clients is by pitching people who already know you. Cold traffic probably isn’t going to convert.

If you are re-targeting people you know have been exposed to you already, however, you have a much greater chance at converting.

3. Facebook Pixel in Action

Okay, so you’ve got the pixel implemented and it’s tracking.

Now what?

Let’s walk through a one simple scenario of moving users from cold traffic to potential leads. We will assume you are starting from scratch with no audience to speak of.

Note: this is meant to be a conceptual walk through the process. I completely understand that you won’t understand the nuances of using the Facebook ads system!

Building An Audience Using Initial Tracking

  • Create a brand new audience comprised of the demographics and attributes you are targeting.
  • Create an ad using an article from your website. Don’t worry about including a call to action. At this point, you simply want people interested in your content to click through.
  • As the ad runs, those who click the link to your website will be tracked using the pixel.

Re-targeting with Your New Audience

  • Create a new audience using the traffic that clicked on your initial ad.
  • Now that you know you are marketing to people who have already been introduced to your brand, you should include a call to action such as collecting email addresses.
  • At that point, you can move over to email marketing with a larger ask.

Leveraging Existing Web Traffic

If you already have regular traffic on your website, you can use that to your advantage, too. The Facebook pixel will track users on your website even if they don’t come specifically from Facebook.

One option is to create an audience of users who have visited your website in the last 30 days. You could also target users who have been to a specific offer page with a harder sell because you know they must be interested in what you’re offering.

If you don’t want to send ads to those who have already claimed your offer, you can target people who have been to your offer page while excluding those who have reached your “Thank You” page.

Final Thoughts

There are so many possibilities when it comes to Facebook ads! Even if you aren’t ready to start, though, you should absolutely implement that pixel so you can start tracking. That way, when you’re ready to go full steam ahead, the data will be there waiting for you!

Looking to dig deeper into Facebook ads or social media strategy? Book a 60-minute strategy session!

market your business

The Fortune is in the Focus: How to Properly Market Your Business

Why do some marketing campaigns succeed while others fail? The fortune is in the focus.

Throwing spaghetti against the wall to see if it will stick may ultimately get you to your goal, but it will be a painful process. Having a clear idea of what you are looking to achieve so you can map your route from Point A to Point B is significantly more efficient.

To get started, we’ll map out three necessary elements of a marketing campaign. Let’s take a look at a fictional business — a brick-and-mortar candy shop — as a way to illustrate each point.

Know Your Goal

What is the goal of this candy shop? Don’t jump the gun! Yes, the goal is entice individuals to purchase candy, but let’s get even more specific than that.

As a content marketing effort, the company writes a blog post about their love for Halloween. The title and social media messaging are critical to converting passive readers of that blog post into attentive, potential customers.

For example, a generic title or social media post may read, “Candy Corner’s Love of Halloween Has Lasted A Decade.” That line is accurate, but it doesn’t speak to the business focus, which is to draw people to the store.

A more focused title or post may read, “Candy Corner is a Must-Stop Shop on Halloween.”

The story itself is the same in both examples, but the messaging in the focused post is specifically targeted toward the business goal.

Know Your Worth

What is it you are offering your customers or clients? Be careful with this one because it isn’t always what you believe to be the obvious answer.

In our candy store example, your knee-jerk response may be that this particular business is offering customers candy. Easy enough, right?

While that may be true, promoting “candy” as the reason customers should purchase won’t set this business apart from others. The key is to look at the differentiating factors between this business and the competition.

A few things to consider:

  • How many stores are there specifically dedicated to candy nowadays? Perhaps this business is providing an experience to customers beyond walking into a chain store to purchase candy.
  • What kind of variety exists within this candy store? More than likely, a candy store will have a much wider selection than a grocery store.
  • Is the product of higher quality than packaged candy? Maybe this store makes their own candy or chocolate without preservatives.

Understanding what sets your business apart from the competition is critical to an effective marketing campaign.

Know Your Audience

You must get inside the heads of your target customers to know why they are the right people to buy from you. Making this a bit more tricky, you may have multiple audiences you are targeting at any given time.

For our fictional candy store, there would be multiple audiences:

  • Grandparents may come to the store because they want to have a fun day out with grandchildren and provide them something special. Messaging may speak to “spoiling” them.
  • Parents may appreciate the higher quality of candy. Messaging may speak to ingredients, fewer preservatives, or better taste.
  • Older individuals may have a sense of nostalgia going to a candy store as they did when they were younger. Messaging can speak to re-living their youth.
  • Children are an obvious target audience, but this is a great example a need for a different marketing strategy. How much money will children have and how will they get to your store? While they will consume your product, they may not be one of your primary targets.

The audience you speak to will depend on which is the most likely to convert. You may start with one group and then add another once you’ve found success with the first.

It’s important that you don’t try to speak to everyone at once. The more specific you are with your targeting, the better the results. It may seem counter-intuitive, but it’s true that when you try to speak to everyone, you ultimately speak to no one.

How do you focus your marketing campaigns? Where do you start and how do you come up with your messaging?