The 3 Things I Did to Get a Response From a Cold Reach-Out

I was conducting lead generation on behalf of a client and received a response that made me smile. The individual said:

I actually looked at your link because you wrote a very personal and to the point note.

He went on to say that what I was offering wasn’t for him, but the fact that he took the time to respond should speak volumes to you if you’re in sales (and, if you’re an entrepreneur, you’re in sales).

What did I do that was so personal? Three basic things:

1. I read his LinkedIn profile.

Yes, that’s right. I read it. It seems simple and — to some — a waste of time, but it is a few minutes that goes a long way.

As someone who conducts cold reach-outs, when I’m on the receiving end of them, I know exactly why they bother me or why I’m happy to respond:

If you have clearly done your homework (which could mean spending all of three minutes reading my LinkedIn profile) and recognize I’m truly a good fit for what you’re offering, I’m interested … or, at the very least, happy to respond.

If it’s obvious you’ve sent the same message to me that you’re sending to another 100 people, I (shake my head and) move on.

2. I referenced his experiences.

This person had a long career in journalism — it’s clear he’s led an interesting life. When I wrote him a note, I mentioned that. Suddenly, he recognizes I care. He recognizes I took three minutes to read his profile. He recognizes I’m not a bot or an automated system.

I’m seeing him as more than a target.

I’ve read a number of articles lately that talk about solving problems instead of selling services. This is completely true, but let’s take it one step further. We should care about solving those problems. Caring goes a long way, and it can be felt … even through the written word on LinkedIn.

3. I was conversational.

I read a great article today about dealing with objections in sales and agreed with the concept, but the example language used was way too formal and “salesy” for me. My No. 1 tip when it comes to reach-outs: just talk.

Yes, it’s important to be grammatically correct. It’s important to spell things properly. It’s important to sound intelligent. But it’s also important to talk to people as though they’re human beings instead of a statistic.

You can tailor the language to the industry — a doctor will probably respond better to more formal conversation than a life coach — but don’t sound like you copied the text out of a Sales 101 textbook.

In closing …

I truly believe 10 personal reach-outs beat 100 stock reach-outs any day of the week. Yes, there are other factors to being sales savvy, but being personal is No. 1 in my book.

Spend that three minutes reading someone’s LinkedIn profile. Trust me, it’ll pay off.

About Chrissie Wywrot

Chrissie Wywrot is a B2B lead generator and personal brand strategist who works with passionate entrepreneurs and professional athletes. To learn more about her services, visit her LinkedIn profile or email her at chrissie@chrissiewywrot.com.

What to Do on LinkedIn When You Have Little Time for LinkedIn

LinkedIn is an untapped resource for many entrepreneurs … how do you know if you’re leaving something on the table? It’s a question I’m asked time and time again. Let’s get started by gauging the value the platform has to offer you and your business.

Ask yourself these two questions:

  1. Are you business-to-business or business-to-consumer? If you are business-to-business, LinkedIn is a must. If you are business-to-consumer, you can still leverage the platform to network, generate media coverage, or – in some cases – generate business.
  2. Is your industry active on LinkedIn? Individuals in some industries use LinkedIn as a critical business tool. Those in other industries have a profile, but rarely use it. If you are in an industry that regularly uses the platform, you should engage on LinkedIn in some capacity.

Businesses should map out a plan before engaging on any social media platform, especially LinkedIn. I’ve heard too many entrepreneurs say things like,

“I’m on Twitter/Facebook/Instagram because I thought I was supposed to be …”

Many of those same entrepreneurs are so strapped for time, the last thing they think about doing each day is engaging on social media. I’ve learned this is especially true of LinkedIn.

Have you found yourself uttering any of these statements?

“I have a profile, but have no idea what to do with it.”

“I plugged in my resume to LinkedIn … is that right?”

“I get a ton of requests, but don’t do anything with them because I don’t want to get a bunch of solicitations.”

“I want to learn more about LinkedIn, but have no time.”

If any of these are you, today is your lucky day! I am going to spell out the three things you should do if you:

  • have no idea what to do on LinkedIn
  • have no time to even think about LinkedIn, let alone the time to log in and engage with someone on LinkedIn

Alright, let’s get started!

1. Determine your LinkedIn purpose

Before you do anything, you need to pinpoint what LinkedIn can do for you and your business. If you conclude the benefit of LinkedIn isn’t worth your time, you can move on to something else. On the other hand, you may realize LinkedIn is a huge untapped resource.

Ask yourself these two questions:

1. What is the best thing that can happen as a result of using LinkedIn?

Think pie-in-the-sky. Perhaps you want to …

  • be featured on a major news outlet
  • get a big-time freelance writing gig
  • connect with one of the biggest influencers in your industry and schedule a networking call
  • land your dream client

2. How do you achieve that “best thing?”

Let’s say your purpose is to land your dream client. What steps would or could lead up to that? Do you reach out cold? Comment on his or her posts or articles? Offer a free trial for your product or service?

If you’re looking to be featured on a major news outlet, you probably start by writing or producing your own original content and then reaching out to media.

No matter your goal, lay out the exact step-by-step process that will result in achieving your LinkedIn purpose.

2. Optimize your headline and current experience

Once you’ve determined your LinkedIn goal, you can gear your profile toward it. The most important sections of your profile are your headline and current experience. You want both to reflect your purpose or strength and include keywords.

Think about the people you want to notice you. What do you want them to know? Put that in your headline.

If it’s possible someone would search for your services, what would they search? Make sure those words or phrases are included in your current experience section. The tone of what you say will be dependent on your personality and industry, but the overall goal is to sell yourself through your profile.

3. Execute or hire based on the potential benefit

This is where the time factor comes in.

If you go through steps one and two and recognize a benefit to using LinkedIn, you’ll want to make sure you invest some time or hire someone to invest time on your behalf.

What does “investing time” in LinkedIn look like?

Engage in the following steps, starting with the first item and adding subsequent steps as you can:

  1. Make relevant connections. LinkedIn is a Rolodex of business value — don’t let it fall by the wayside! At the very least, connect with relevant people and build a quality network.
  2. Like or comment on posts. The more you like or comment on posts, the more users see your headline and, hopefully, click on your profile.
  3. Share relevant content. One step further than liking or commenting on other people’s posts or content is to post yourself. Share content helpful to your target audience that accurately represents you as a professional.
  4. Go premium. If there is money to be had through LinkedIn, you probably want to invest in a premium account. There are five different types of premium accounts: Premium Career, Sales Navigator, Recruiter Lite, Premium Business, and LinkedIn Learning. Each provides a unique set of benefits – you can “see who’s viewed your profile,” InMail individuals who aren’t connections, and do some serious prospecting through Sales Navigator.

If you see a significant benefit to using LinkedIn but don’t have time to do it yourself, you can always hire someone to do it for you. Helping clients engage and convert leads on LinkedIn is one of my favorite things to do!

There are plenty of options to get started with me, including a strategy session to learn more about how you can leverage your brand, LinkedIn profile optimization, or a strategy audit to receive specific steps to grow your online presence.

I’m looking forward to your comments below and emails to chrissie@chrissiewywrot.com!

LinkedIn is the Best Networking Party You’ll Ever Attend

I was recently told by one of my entrepreneurial friends that my engagement on LinkedIn had inspired her to dig even deeper into networking within the platform. I was posting success after success connecting with influencers and potential leads and it led to her reaching out to people she’d never considered reaching out to.

I find that success, quite simply, by looking at LinkedIn as the best networking party I could ever attend … and you can replicate my actions!

Here’s how:

1. Showcase Your Credentials

You can’t be afraid to showcase what you’ve done. I’ve worked for an NFL team, many athletes across a number of sports, and been an entrepreneur for more than three years. It’s important that I say that clearly and directly within my profile.

LinkedIn Networking Party Analogy: How would you introduce yourself to someone at an in-person gathering? What are the most relevant things about your professional background? Make sure those are highlighted within your profile and let me know if you need help.

2. Strike Up A Conversation

Be a real person! Reach out to individuals in your network just to learn more about their businesses. Tell them you think they’re impressive or that you love reading their content on the platform. Send connection requests to individuals you don’t know with a note that compliments them or inquires about their work.

LinkedIn Networking Party Analogy: Don’t be that person at the party who keeps to him or herself or only talks to the one you drove with. Put yourself out there and learn about other people — you never know where you’ll find common ground or who you’ll end up collaborating with. The best leads are often disguised as irrelevant connections!

3. Take An Online World Offline

Let LinkedIn be a conduit to connecting with people over the phone or in person. I love scheduling calls with others in my industry just to talk for 15-20 minutes about who they are, what they do within their business, and their longterm goals. Sometimes that turns into a pitch for services, other times it’s just a conversation that helps me get better acquainted with someone.

LinkedIn Networking Party Analogy: One of the great things about networking parties is they allow you to inform others of what you do and who you target. You may meet someone who knows someone who is looking for someone just like you. That same phenomenon occurs through LinkedIn by connecting offline! Schedule an informational call and you may just hear, “Let me connect you with …”

Noteworthy: The Athlete Advantage

If you’ve played sports in college or within a professional league, I have one piece of advice regarding LinkedIn: exploit the heck out that experience.

I don’t care what sport it was, whether you’re male or female, or whether you won a championship … playing sports at either of those levels is a point of conversation and something people want to be associated with.

As someone who worked in digital media for an NFL team for nearly 10 years, I can attest that this applies beyond those who play on the field or court. I accrued so many LinkedIn connections over that decade that are paying huge dividends now.

Okay, you may be thinking, that sounds great. How do I do that? I don’t want to come across as self-absorbed.

Fantastic question! Here is how you maximize that experience:

  1. Optimize your LinkedIn profile. Make sure your headline references your background in sports and that your experience is complete. There will be plenty of curious eyes on your profile — make it good!
  2. Show your depth. Athletes — especially those who aren’t headliners — are competitive, disciplined, and have plenty of stories to share. Remember that LinkedIn is a networking party — provide anecdotes as they pertain to your business objectives. Life and business lessons are always embedded in sports stories.
  3. Connect with relevant people. This includes other athletes, influencers, business professionals, and media. The key is to connect with them before you need something, but after you are well on your way with profile optimization and sharing content. Form the relationships now so you can ask for what you need later.

The moral of the story? Treat LinkedIn like the online networking party it is and build your business in the process!

LinkedIn help

Don’t Make This Mistake When Writing Your LinkedIn Profile

There are a number of factors to consider when writing your LinkedIn profile: target audience, search engine optimization (SEO), and call to action to name a few. After all, you’re looking to convince users (target audience) to buy from you (call to action) and you want to be found (SEO).

But even when everything is written well, there is one critical mistake made over and over again that can greatly decrease your chances of generating leads on LinkedIn.

And that mistake is … Readability.

You can write the greatest sales copy of the century, but fail miserably if it is thrown into one gigantic paragraph. The average human attention span is eight seconds, which means you have the blink of an eye to make a great first impression. You better have a profile that is easy to digest or you’ll lose the audience you’re working so hard for.

This is especially challenging within a LinkedIn profile because the platform doesn’t allow for formatted text (e.g. bold, italics, font size). You have to get creative to make your profile stand out, but the first step is making sure it’s readable.

Here are some of my suggestions:

Paragraphs

I am a huge advocate of breaking up text into paragraphs. There is nothing worse than trying to read something that is a giant word wall.

Now, I get that paragraph length is a personal preference and that mine tend to be on the shorter side. But in this age of short attention spans, I want to keep eyes moving. To me, structuring paragraphs within a profile is an art form that can make all the difference between someone getting lost in your copy to feeling lost reading your copy.

Lists

Lists are another great way to keep eyes moving through your copy, and you can work them in to just about any section of your profile. Take a look at what you’re writing and if there are sentences structured with commas (i.e. “I am talented in item A, item B, and item C”), consider breaking those items up into a list.

You will have to use symbols as bullet points since LinkedIn doesn’t allow for formatted text within its profile sections, but you can get creative with what you choose. Visit websites like copypastecharacter.com to find symbols for your profile.

Subheads

Since you can’t add HTML to your profile you won’t get the SEO benefits of subheads, but you will break up your text and draw attention to key points within your profile. To see the power of this effect, take a look at my LinkedIn profile.

By capitalizing all words and using symbols before and after those words, the subheads within these profile sections stand out. Not only is your eye drawn to those sections, you’ll find yourself reading them. This technique is a tool to better communicate what you and your profile are all about!

Symbols

I’ve already mentioned symbols in two of the other sections because they are critical within LinkedIn profiles. When you use symbols, it successfully breaks up text and draws attention to key points.

Now, I recognize that symbols are fun and it’s easy to get carried away. Make sure you pick professional icons that look good together!

Final Thoughts on Formatting

Readability is critical for a successful profile and formatting is a key piece of that. Get creative with the way you use capitalization, symbols, spacing, and paragraphs to draw attention to what you can do for the audience you draw to your profile.

And if the entire thing sounds like too much work, take advantage of my LinkedIn Profile Development service.

Good luck!

LinkedIn Profile

Resume Or Life Story? What To Say Within Your LinkedIn Profile

Should you write your LinkedIn profile the same way you would write a resume or should you tell your life story?

Knowing what to say within your LinkedIn profile is much harder than it seems. Sit down to start your Summary or Current Experience section and you may come down with a case of writer’s block.

There are a number of factors involved when it comes to what you should say within your LinkedIn profile and how you should say it.

1. Industry

First thing’s first: what industry are you in? An investment banker isn’t going to sound the same as a film producer. A doctor may lose credibility if he or she cites a love of wine or cigar smoking within his or her profile. A freelance writer may miss out on jobs if copy is dry or uninteresting.

It’s important to look at your profile through the filter of the field you’re in. What would someone looking for your services expect to see? How can you use what you write within your profile to show off your skills or expertise?

2. Personality

Stay true to you when you’re writing your profile. Here’s what I mean: if you don’t like sharing personal information, then don’t. If you like to tell stories, tell them. You’ve reached this point in your career because of who you are — don’t shy away from then when you’re talking about yourself within your LinkedIn profile.

At the same time, you want to make sure what you say comes off the way you intend it to come off. Having another set of eyes look through what you’ve written is always a good idea, especially when you’re really looking to showcase your personality.

Something you think is funny may come off rude. Something you think is clear may come off confusing. Get a proofreader!

3. Credibility

What approach will give you the most credibility? Put yourself in the shoes of the people you’re targeting. What could they read within your profile that would lead them to feeling comfortable giving you their money? What would inspire them to want to work with you?

This is the inbound marketing process, which walks people toward wanting to work with you before you even have a conversation.

The right approach will vary by industry and individual. A sales rep, for example, would want to list numbers to show competency. Someone selling a product would want to list key features or testimonials that showcase product benefits. Know what others will want to see from you and include it within your profile.

4. Context

Take a step back from your profile and look at the big picture. Envision your target audience, or who you want to be viewing your profile. What are their key attributes? Then ask yourself these three questions:

  • Where are they coming from? In other words, how will they find your profile?
  • What must they know about you if they are going to do business with you?
  • What do you want them to do once they’ve read your profile?

These three questions will guide you through the process of understanding what you should say to your audience. If your LinkedIn profile were an experience, what would you want that experience to be like for those who visit?

You may need help or guidance when it comes to answering these questions, which is completely normal. You may not even want to write your profile! No problem.

Schedule a Strategy Call or LinkedIn Profile Optimization. We’ll have your profile representing you in no time!

LinkedIn Profile

How to Get Your LinkedIn Profile Ready to Be Seen

I was recently asked an eloquent question around LinkedIn:

How do I get people to buy from me without being smarmy?

Really a fantastic question … and I have an answer!

There are three important steps to generating sales on LinkedIn:

  1. Get your profile ready to be seen
  2. Engage, engage, engage!
  3. Reach out to leads

It’s really that simple, though I know it isn’t simple at all. How do you get your profile ready to be seen? Where do you engage? What do you say when you reach out to a potential lead?

Today we are going to take a look at preparing your profile to be seen, starting with one of the most important aspects of LinkedIn: having a great headline.

It’s All About the Headline

Your headline is critical to the attention you receive on LinkedIn. When you have a headline that pulls attention from potential clients, curiosity will get the best of them and they will click through to your profile.

So … what makes a great headline?

The key is to adequately represent what you provide. How to do that will vary by industry. For example, I receive the most attention for my services (LinkedIn Profile Optimization) by putting those words first in my headline.

Others who don’t have a specific deliverable (a business coach or marketing consultant, for example) may do better with an action-oriented headline such as, “Generating Leads for Small Business Owners in Metro Detroit.”

Now, I just used that last headline as an example, but it gets you thinking, doesn’t it? Even if you don’t have a small business in Metro Detroit, you want to see what that person has to offer. It resonates far deeper than a headline that reads, “Marketing Consultant,” or “CEO.”

Ask yourself what your top deliverable is and represent that within your headline. Also, make sure you put the most relevant keywords within the first 75 characters since that number of characters is always visible when engaging.

What Would You Say First?

When it comes to what you should write within your Summary and Current Experience sections, think about what you would say to someone who would most benefit from your product or service.

  • How would you best describe your product or services?
  • What problem(s) are you solving?
  • What are the next steps to getting started with you and your business?

What you want to say within your Summary and Current Experience sections are what you would tell someone who just walked into your brick-and-mortar establishment. Instead of an actual store, though, they’ve walked into your LinkedIn profile.

The difference between a Summary and Current Experience section is kind of like the difference between a cover letter and a resume. Your Summary will talk more about who you are as a professional while your Current Experience section will talk more about your deliverables.

Don’t Forget Keywords

What would someone type into LinkedIn search to find what you’re offering? Those are the keywords you want to include within your headline, job title(s), and copy. If you have characters left over (LinkedIn provides 2,000 per section), you can even list keywords at the bottom. Simply refer to them as “Specialties” or “Expertise” and then list them out.

Add Articles, Multimedia, and Websites

LinkedIn doesn’t allow for dynamic links within your body copy, but you can add links at the bottom of each section. Great things to include are sales landing pages, articles you’ve written or been featured in, multimedia (e.g. videos, podcasts), links to your website, or PDF brochures.

You want to link to anything that provides credibility or links users to the next step in your sales funnel.

Make it Readable

Make sure what you write is easy to read. I know this can be difficult since LinkedIn doesn’t allow for formatted text within sections, but there are ways to write something that is easy on the eyes.

Avoid giant blocks of text — use plenty of breaks, headers (use all caps for these), lists and icons. You don’t want it to look like an emoji app blew up on your profile (keep it professional!), but some strategically-placed icons never hurt anyone.

Also, proof it! Have someone else take a look at what you’ve written and point out any errors. Grammatical and spelling errors are the best ways to look unprofessional!

Be YOU

Don’t forget to be yourself! Adding some personality to your profile can be a huge benefit. Articulate your passions, write with a particular flair, or add a little humor. Obviously, a profile for a tax consultant will have a far different tone than that of a business coach, but you get the idea. Make sure what you say is memorable!

Okay, what do you think? Did I leave anything out? Feel free to ask questions below! And if all of this seems like way too much work, take a look at my LinkedIn Profile Optimization service.

LinkedIn vs. Facebook

LinkedIn vs. Facebook: Which is Better for Your Business?

It’s LinkedIn vs. Facebook … which social media platform is better for your business? The answer may surprise you.

While the two platforms look alike (and many on LinkedIn complain Facebook-type posts are “taking over”), they each have distinctive drawbacks and benefits.

Let’s explore them, shall we?

B2B vs. B2C

Whether you’re business-to-business (B2B) or business-to-consumer (B2C) may impact which platform you choose. LinkedIn is set up for B2B engagement while Facebook is set up for B2C. There are, however, circumstances where the scenarios flip. The key is understanding why your audience is on either platform.

Let’s say, for example, you are targeting individuals working with a network marketing company. Even though that is a B2B initiative, Facebook would be an ideal spot to find your target since many network marketers use Facebook as away to drive business.

If you are a B2C business but your target is specific to a professional segment, however, LinkedIn may work for you. A product for executives or service for business travelers are two examples.

Advertising

If you’re looking to leverage paid advertising for your product or service, it’s important to know the differences between Facebook and LinkedIn.

Facebook has a more robust platform and is far cheaper than LinkedIn. You can re-target using Facebook ads by implementing a pixel on your website and creating custom audiences of those who clicked through to earlier ads.

You can also upload your email list to Facebook, target those individuals who already like your page (and their friends), or those who have engaged with your posts.

Where LinkedIn edges out Facebook is in the B2B space. If you’re pushing an ad to all C-level employees or you’re selling a big ticket business item, LinkedIn may be a better option.

The thing to know with LinkedIn advertising is that it’s much more expensive ($3-5 per click) than Facebook, so you want to have a specific objective before you give it a try.

The News Feed

LinkedIn is a much better platform for organic engagement since it doesn’t carry the dreaded Facebook algorithm. Being seen on LinkedIn is far easier (at least for now) with organic posts, though the platform did make more difficult to gain traction with native posts.

If you’re just starting on Facebook, you can expect to leverage advertising for initial likes on your page unless you have a large, relevant network to leverage. One rule applies for both platforms: create content users engage with (like, share, comment) and it will be seen.

Search

One significant benefit for businesses on LinkedIn over Facebook is the search function. This comes down to the way people use LinkedIn compared to Facebook and the function itself.

LinkedIn’s search function is enough of a reason to have an optimized profile for yourself and your team members, especially if you are a B2B. Let’s say I’m looking for a business coach. Where am I likely to search? LinkedIn would be my No. 1 spot, without question.

Not only do I find a variety of coaches I can choose from, I can see if I have any common connections to attain a reference or get an introduction.

Local vs. Online

Local businesses must be on Facebook without question, whether you’re a B2B or B2C.

Since you’re local, you can leverage your personal network to extend the reach of your business page. This shouldn’t be done all the time (you don’t want to drive your personal network crazy), but in calculated spots (Think a local coffee shop asking friends to share photos on their personal profiles).

Facebook advertising is also ideal for local businesses. Just about everyone enters where they live into their personal profile, making it a cakewalk to target potential customers at a low cost.

There is still a benefit to being on LinkedIn as a local business, but being on Facebook is a must.

Final Thoughts

Deciding where to focus your online marketing attention can be a tough decision: do you go with what’s most popular or what you know best?

The answer is neither: you go with the best fit for your business. Facebook or LinkedIn will be a fit for your business … it’s just a matter of finding out if it’s one, the other, or both.

Hopefully this helped you narrow things down. If you’re looking for further customized help, you can reach out for a one-hour strategy session or a LinkedIn Profile Optimization!

influencer marketing

How to Leverage Influencer Marketing to Grow Your Brand

Any online promotional strategy should include an influencer marketing piece.

What is influencer marketing?

Influencer marketing is a type of marketing that focuses on using key leaders to drive your brand’s message to the larger market. Rather than marketing directly to a large group of consumers, you instead inspire / hire / pay influencers to get out the word for you. – Tap Influencer

I personally recommend that you focus on the organic side of this strategy. As a successful business owner, you have an audience that can provide something to the influencer, so paying or hiring someone isn’t necessary. The key is finding a mutual benefit between the two of you.

A Case Study Metaphor: Fitness Guru

Let’s say you are a fitness guru, building your business around online consultations. You have found success through referrals and have modest followings on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. You’d like to expand your online reach as a way to automate your lead generation process.

You’ve believe influencer marketing can help you achieve this goal. Where do you start? There are a number of parameters to keep in mind when determining who you will reach out to, when, and how.

Who

Who will you reach out to? There are a few rules of thumb when considering the influencers you’re going to engage with as part of your influencer marketing strategy.

  1. Choose a non-competitor. Yes, your competitors will be the most relevant to your brand, but you don’t want to open that can of worms. Not only may you be perceived as trying to steal audience members from your competitors, you’re shifting the attention of your audience to someone else who offers your services.
  2. Choose a mid-level influencer. Don’t reach so high that your effort gets lost in a sea of tags and shoutouts. “Internet famous” people are inundated with messages and yours will easily get lost. There are exceptions to this, though, that we will get into another time.
  3. Choose a related industry professional. It’s important that the person you choose can benefit from your audience and vice versa. While there are situations in which you will simply post something and pray an influencer throws you a bone, it’s ideal to choose someone who will appreciate the additional traffic you are providing him or her.

When

Influencer marketing can happen anytime, but basing it around a particular article or event will generate the best results.

When someone in your field publishes an article, engages in an interview, or holds an event, he or she is looking to expand business reach. By giving a shoutout to that person in light of that content or event, you are becoming a part of their promotional strategy.

They will appreciate you recognizing their hard work and endorsing it as something others would benefit from.

How

How do you implement an influencer marketing strategy? You can write a blog on your website that mentions and links to the influencer, offer a shoutout on social media, or create a video that mentions the person or business.

The key is promoting what you do on a social media platform your influencer is a part of. Here are the best platforms for influencer marketing, ranked best to least best:

  1. Twitter. I LOVE Twitter for influencer marketing. You don’t have to get through any red tape to get to the person or brand you are engaging with and the benefit can be instant. If the brand you are engaging with retweets what you post, you’ve already expanded your reach. If you are engaging around a particular event, make sure you use that event’s hashtag.
  2. LinkedIn. Since LinkedIn is a B2B platform, you are going to get a lot of bang for your buck when you tag someone else within the news feed. Mention someone within an original blog you write and then post it along with a tag. You can also share content from an influencer on your timeline and give it a little endorsement while tagging the person or brand. This will expand your reach, but it will also nudge someone you are trying to woo into becoming a client or customer.
  3. Instagram. You can repost someone’s photo on Instagram, comment, or share. If you have a big, relevant following, reposting with their handle will go a long way. If you don’t know how to repost within Instagram, check out repostapp.
  4. Facebook. The best way to gain traction on Facebook is to share someone else’s post and tag their page when you do. This most taps into the “good karma” category. It’s a good strategy if you’re looking to gain this person or brand as a lead for your business because you’re starting out the relationship by giving them something for nothing.

Finishing Our Case Study

Now that we’ve gone through all of that, let’s finish our case study. Our fitness guru is looking to expand reach to automate lead generation. How might she tap into influencer marketing to do that?

  • Find complementary services. Fitness goes hand-in-hand with diet and nutrition. While our guru may offer services around diet plans, she can share recipes from healthy eating brands,  articles written about clean eating, or other fitness gurus that work in a different niche. For example, if our fitness guru specializes in yoga, she could share the work of a weightlifter. For everything she shares, she would tag the handle of the brand.
  • Tap into challenges. Twitter and Instagram are great platforms to find people engaging in a particular activity because of the use of hashtags. Research the top hashtags for training for a 5K or marathon and comment on the posts of those people. During the race, use the event hashtag to offer encouragement to those participating and give a shoutout to the face facilitator.
  • Engage the stars. Once a strong enough following is built (at least 1,000 followers on each platform), our fitness guru can work to engage in conversation with some of the stars in her industry. Comment on their articles, compliment their business, and express admiration!
  • Engage the media. A great influencer marketing strategy on Twitter is to engage media that covers your industry. Our guru can retweet articles and reply to tweets to compliment content they’ve created (she’ll want to reference the content so they know she actually read it). Once she’s built a rapport with those media members, she can start pitching them for her own stories.

Final Thoughts

Well, there you have it, and there is plenty more where that came from! While these are great tips that apply to any business, digging into the customization of each brand and each target will open up even more possibilities.

How have you tapped into influencer marketing? What has it done for your business?

How to make LinkedIn work for you

Make LinkedIn Work for You with the Right Approach

My top product right now optimizes your LinkedIn profile to best represent you as a professional. But what do you do once your profile is exactly how you want it? Does the Field of Dreams model, “If you build it, they will come,” apply here?

Definitely not.

Here are a few things you can do once your profile is exactly how you want it to make sure you are seen and appreciated for who you are as a professional.

Engage, Engage, Engage

If you are trying to find quality dating material, do you sit at home and hope someone knocks on your door? Of course not.

Now let’s take that a step further. When you do go out to meet people, do you walk up to them and say, “Hi, my name is Chrissie. I’m looking for a significant other. Are you interested?” I hope not!

You need to engage on LinkedIn, but engage for the sake of meeting others and learning, not because you are trying to sell something. Join groups of your peers and engage your target audience. Even better if both apply.

For example, entrepreneurs are a key target of mine, but I am also an entrepreneur myself. It’s a win-win.

Be A Thought Leader

Just as engagement will generate exposure for your skills or business, so will being a thought leader. If your profile is optimized to best represent you, simply show you know what you’re talking about and you will gain exposure to meet your objective on the platform.

Since I’m utilizing my LinkedIn tagline to showcase what I do (i.e. LinkedIn Profile Development Expert), simply exposing my profile promotes what I do. I don’t need to “cold call” others or publish countless updates asking others to view my profile. If I write content others deem useful, they will read my articles and, in turn, see what I do.

The same is true for you. Whether you are looking for a job, networking opportunities, or investment partners, showcasing your expertise is never a bad thing. Then once others see your articles, they will click through to see your profile. Boom.

Use LinkedIn’s Free Trial!

This is especially true if you are a job-seeker. LinkedIn allows for one 30-day free trial every 12 months, which gives you the opportunity to InMail anyone on the platform. This is huge if you are a job-seeker, because you can follow up with professionals who work at the companies at which you are applying for jobs.

Don’t just use it to look for a job, though. Take the opportunity to ask questions of others in your field. You will have an opportunity to gain expert advice from others who have succeeded before you. Ask them how they got to where they are, which skills you should hone in on, and the best way to present yourself during the application process.

Not only will this help as you look for a job, it will show that you want to get better as a professional, something so important in the hiring process.

LinkedIn’s free trial is also good for networking and generating sales leads. You can test out one of the packages to see if it’s worth it to pay the money for the premium membership. If you leverage it the right way, LinkedIn has the power to transform your career or your business.

What Are You Waiting For?

So many professionals are on the LinkedIn platform but don’t take advantage of what an awesome tool it is! Take a few minutes each day to engage in groups, write your own content, and comment on the content of others, and you’ll find yourself making invaluable professional connections that alter the course of your career in amazing ways.

LinkedIn Profile Development

Make LinkedIn Work for You with the Right Writing

I help top-level professionals reconstruct and re-write their LinkedIn profiles to properly convey their personal narrative. The most successful people on this platform may be missing the mark because they aren’t properly communicating who they are and why they do what they do.

Communication is so important when it comes to success in business. If you don’t believe me, read what billionaire Richard Branson had to say in Thursday’s Forbes article, Branson, Buffett Agree: This Skill Is Your Ticket To Career Success.

“Today, if you want to succeed as an entrepreneur, you also have to be a storyteller,” he explained in a recent Virgin Blog. “It is not enough to create a great product; you also have to work out how to let people know about it.”

That’s where I come in. So many entrepreneurs and business people are doing great things, but need improvement when it comes to conveying their stories.

The Why is Just as Important as the What

Your target audience — investors, clients, etc. — will connect more with why you do what you do compared with what you do. There’s a good chance that a number of other businesses are attempting to offer the product or service you’re offering, but if you are especially passionate or specialized, you will be a head above the rest.

Carmine Gallo of Forbes writes in his article that he recently heard from a young man who was frustrated after applying for a technical job because, on paper, he had no better coding skills than his competition.

“But the young man was a real student of communication,” wrote Gallo. “He studied the company and created an ‘elevator pitch’ – not about himself, but about the company’s premier products. He interviewed on a Friday and got the job Monday morning for double his previous salary. The recruiter told the young man that he could explain the product even better than the company’s existing sales staff. On paper his technical skills put him lower on the list of candidates, but his communication skills set him apart.”

Through his communication, the young man conveyed passion and hard work that helped him stand out and get the job.

We Can’t All Be Writers

Let’s face it: we can’t all be writers. Writing is one of those tricky skills that all of us must possess at some capacity, but some professionals are simply better verbal storytellers than written.

I like to think of what I do for LinkedIn profiles as turning your page into a full-fledged feature about who you are and why you do what you do. It may not seem like much, but to someone passively skimming your profile, words that draw them in to your story might just result in a reach out.

Then you can take it from there.

It’s All Your Ideas

Anyone can regurgitate a resume onto a LinkedIn profile. What I do is interview you over the phone to tap into your mind, your passion, and your business to effectively communicate who you are as a professional.

My idea of “good writing” isn’t perfect, AP style prose. My idea of “good writing” is something that hits you on an emotional level. When someone can see that you are passionate and love what you do, they will be drawn to you. That is what makes for good business: genuine individuals wanting to make a difference.

Wondering How to Get Started?

If this sounds like something you’d be interested in, check out LinkedIn Profile Development.