How to Get Responses on Sales Navigator

Have you invested in Sales Navigator but can’t seem to generate any results?

If so, ask yourself this question: Am I just going through the motions?

Sales Navigator is an awesome tool for any business or entrepreneur looking to generate leads, but it’s important to put in the time and effort it takes to produce results.

Here are five steps you can take to start generating results:

1. Articulate Your Purpose

I’d wager many of us skip this step without even realizing it. You have a business with a clear focus and, therefore, can just dive into searching for potential leads … right?

Wrong.

Make sure you get organized before you set up your searches by asking yourself questions to narrow down your target:

  • Am I targeting businesses or individuals?
  • If I am targeting businesses, who are the decision-makers within those businesses relevant to my services?
  • What is my ultimate goal in connecting with my target? (e.g. schedule a demo, schedule a discovery call, sign up for a service)
  • What are the key fields within search that will produce ideal results? Do I work best with businesses of a certain size or within a certain industry?
  • Am I looking for cold traffic (non-connections) or warm traffic (1st- or 2nd-Degree connections)?

2. Fill Your Funnel

Once you’ve narrowed down who you’re looking for, it’s time to conduct searches to fill your funnel. Use Lead Builder to put together one or two searches for your ideal clients. You may be someone who prefers to focus on one core group at a time (e.g. 2nd level connections within your target) or you may enjoy the rapid fire approach of filling your funnel using 3-4 different searches.

Here are two examples of searches for my business, which focuses on working with athletes, nonprofits, and entrepreneurs:

  • My search around athletes is simple: I input the keywords “NFL” (I have a decade’s worth of experience within that industry) and “Athlete.” Then I specify the Health, Wellness, & Fitness industry. Since most professional athletes are on LinkedIn because they have a foundation or business, those filters get me the results I need.
  • My search around entrepreneurs is slightly more complex. My niche is working with passionate entrepreneurs, ideally within the Health, Wellness, & Fitness industry. I have found that leveraging the search term, “Public Speaker” pulls in the type of entrepreneur I’m looking for: someone with a growing business who is also within the public eye. In addition to those two filters, I use the “Entrepreneurship” function and the business size of “1-10.”

Once you have your searches in place, you can start filling your funnel with leads, but beware! This is where it’s easy to veer off course.

3. Study Potential Leads

This is a critical step. It isn’t enough to just hoard potential leads within Sales Navigator and “like” their posts every day. You need to take a look at what these individuals or businesses stand for before adding them and then read what they post. This will give you an idea of who your leads are and whether they will be a good fit to work with you.

Why is this such a big deal? If you take the time to get to know your potential leads and uncover the mutual benefit of working together, it will show when you reach out. Suddenly, you aren’t just looking for business for you … you are looking for a relationship between you and this business or individual.

That genuine approach makes all the difference in the world.

4. Reach Out … Without A Catch

Don’t reach out to a potential lead with an immediate ask for business. Yes, there are certain situations that warrant this (i.e. invitations to an event), but — for the most part — it’s critical to reach out without asking for a purchase or contract.

Let me illustrate why this is important.

I am an entrepreneur with a service-based business. I receive direct reach-outs from business coaches asking me to become a client. This floors me every single time. A business coach/entrepreneur relationship is personal and isn’t something I’m going to dive into after a blind reach out.

I actually have a business coach (shoutout to Natalie Eckdahl) and it’s no coincidence that that relationship formed organically. I was a longtime listener of her Biz Chix podcast and she was offering a price break on her Strategy Sessions. I had just decided to take a step forward with my business strategy and took her up on that offer.

Unbeknownst to her that I was waiting in the wings, she was nurturing me as a lead with her content. The stars then aligned with her offer and I took her up on it. Our relationship has since progressed to me becoming a coaching client and then a part of her ProfitChix Mastermind.

Use this type of engagement within Sales Navigator. Reach out to a lead you know will be a good fit and simply connect to start the ball rolling. If you’ve done your homework and your reach out is genuine, you’ll more than likely receive a response.

5. Nurture Your Leads

How do you nurture your leads? Do what you do best. Post informative content, share relevant articles, like and engage posts. Maybe you send a private message to a potential lead with a link to an article you think is helpful.

The key is to keep plugging away. This can be difficult because you have no idea how you are impacting those you are communicating with, but trust me when I say that you are. If you have a quality service and you know what you’re talking about, you are making a difference with the leads you are speaking to. The illustration to the right is one of my favorites regarding this principle!

To recap, you can generate responses on LinkedIn Sales Navigator by:

  1. Articulating your purpose
  2. Filling your funnel
  3. Studying potential leads
  4. Reaching out … without a catch
  5. Nurturing your leads

Get started and share your results!

LinkedIn Profile

How to Get Your LinkedIn Profile Ready to Be Seen

I was recently asked an eloquent question around LinkedIn:

How do I get people to buy from me without being smarmy?

Really a fantastic question … and I have an answer!

There are three important steps to generating sales on LinkedIn:

  1. Get your profile ready to be seen
  2. Engage, engage, engage!
  3. Reach out to leads

It’s really that simple, though I know it isn’t simple at all. How do you get your profile ready to be seen? Where do you engage? What do you say when you reach out to a potential lead?

Today we are going to take a look at preparing your profile to be seen, starting with one of the most important aspects of LinkedIn: having a great headline.

It’s All About the Headline

Your headline is critical to the attention you receive on LinkedIn. When you have a headline that pulls attention from potential clients, curiosity will get the best of them and they will click through to your profile.

So … what makes a great headline?

The key is to adequately represent what you provide. How to do that will vary by industry. For example, I receive the most attention for my services (LinkedIn Profile Optimization) by putting those words first in my headline.

Others who don’t have a specific deliverable (a business coach or marketing consultant, for example) may do better with an action-oriented headline such as, “Generating Leads for Small Business Owners in Metro Detroit.”

Now, I just used that last headline as an example, but it gets you thinking, doesn’t it? Even if you don’t have a small business in Metro Detroit, you want to see what that person has to offer. It resonates far deeper than a headline that reads, “Marketing Consultant,” or “CEO.”

Ask yourself what your top deliverable is and represent that within your headline. Also, make sure you put the most relevant keywords within the first 75 characters since that number of characters is always visible when engaging.

What Would You Say First?

When it comes to what you should write within your Summary and Current Experience sections, think about what you would say to someone who would most benefit from your product or service.

  • How would you best describe your product or services?
  • What problem(s) are you solving?
  • What are the next steps to getting started with you and your business?

What you want to say within your Summary and Current Experience sections are what you would tell someone who just walked into your brick-and-mortar establishment. Instead of an actual store, though, they’ve walked into your LinkedIn profile.

The difference between a Summary and Current Experience section is kind of like the difference between a cover letter and a resume. Your Summary will talk more about who you are as a professional while your Current Experience section will talk more about your deliverables.

Don’t Forget Keywords

What would someone type into LinkedIn search to find what you’re offering? Those are the keywords you want to include within your headline, job title(s), and copy. If you have characters left over (LinkedIn provides 2,000 per section), you can even list keywords at the bottom. Simply refer to them as “Specialties” or “Expertise” and then list them out.

Add Articles, Multimedia, and Websites

LinkedIn doesn’t allow for dynamic links within your body copy, but you can add links at the bottom of each section. Great things to include are sales landing pages, articles you’ve written or been featured in, multimedia (e.g. videos, podcasts), links to your website, or PDF brochures.

You want to link to anything that provides credibility or links users to the next step in your sales funnel.

Make it Readable

Make sure what you write is easy to read. I know this can be difficult since LinkedIn doesn’t allow for formatted text within sections, but there are ways to write something that is easy on the eyes.

Avoid giant blocks of text — use plenty of breaks, headers (use all caps for these), lists and icons. You don’t want it to look like an emoji app blew up on your profile (keep it professional!), but some strategically-placed icons never hurt anyone.

Also, proof it! Have someone else take a look at what you’ve written and point out any errors. Grammatical and spelling errors are the best ways to look unprofessional!

Be YOU

Don’t forget to be yourself! Adding some personality to your profile can be a huge benefit. Articulate your passions, write with a particular flair, or add a little humor. Obviously, a profile for a tax consultant will have a far different tone than that of a business coach, but you get the idea. Make sure what you say is memorable!

Okay, what do you think? Did I leave anything out? Feel free to ask questions below! And if all of this seems like way too much work, take a look at my LinkedIn Profile Optimization service.