social media strategy

You Better Be Getting Personal on Social Media! Here’s Why:

No, I’m not talking about posting endless selfies or chronicling your day in hour-by-hour increments. I’m talking about being real with your audience. To me, this goes far beyond what you put in a tweet. It’s a business philosophy.

Let me explain.

I’ve probably written it before, but I hate gimmicks. With every fiber of my being. To me, a gimmick screams lack of confidence, lack of morals, or lack of expertise. Either you don’t believe in your skills, you don’t care if you’re executing a bait-and-switch, or you don’t have the ability to generate leads without tricking the general public.

I think there’s a far better way to attract your target audience that leaves gimmicks in the dust. Ready for it? Here it is.

Get personal.

No, it’s not the sexiest approach, because getting personal often means putting in hours of work and then waiting … and who wants to do that? But it’s the right thing to do to build a sustainable business, because you will foster genuine and trustworthy relationships that will convert to clients and customers.

What does “getting personal” on social media look like? Here are a few basic ideas you can put into practice with your own business:

1. Help By Answering Questions

One of the best ways to gain new clients or customers is to help … no strings attached. One of my favorite tools for doing this is Twitter. Search for the most popular hashtags or questions relevant to your business and answer them without asking for anything in return.

Not only will answering that question create a positive rapport between you and the person you’re helping, it will educate your other followers and show them that you are truly out to help.

2. Ask For Genuine Feedback

Asking your audience for genuine feedback helps in a number of ways. First, it refines your messaging. So often, we think we know what our target audience is looking for, but we’re actually off base.

Second, it creates engagement around your brand that has nothing to do with you getting anything in return. You are once again showing a helpful attitude to the person you’re engaging with and to the rest of your followers.

Third, this method will generate content ideas you can use in the future. Since these ideas were suggested from your target audience, they will probably be popular posts!

Suggested tools to use:

  • Facebook. Post a question asking for feedback on your Facebook page and boost the post to your followers for $5-$10. This will ensure more people see your post and will generate a much higher level of engagement than just posting it organically.
  • Email. If you are just starting out, you could actually send one-on-one emails to your subscribers to ask for individual feedback. This would foster relationships with those people, building trust and loyalty. If you have too many to do that, you can send an email to your entire list soliciting feedback.
  • My suggestion is to set up a dummy email address with your name that forwards to your regular email address. That way you aren’t giving away your primary email address, but your audience feels like they’re talking directly to you.
  • Blog. Write an entire blog post around a question you have for your audience and send it out to all of your social media channels.
  • Video. Whether it’s YouTube, Facebook, or Vimeo, using video to ask your audience for direct feedback is personal and genuine. Embed it into a blog post or post to your social channels.

3. Give Out Positive Attention

Much like answering questions for those who don’t yet follow your brand, offering attention to influencers or others in your industry can give you a great reputation with your colleagues and your clients.

This is actually one of my favorite things to do on social media — I love recognizing others for a great article, podcast, or business achievement! By bringing attention to someone else, you show that you are in it because you care and you’ll expand your circle of influence.

Final Thoughts

I understand that social media can’t be “personal” 100-percent of the time. If it were, we’d be spending all of our time on our phones or computers with zero time to run our businesses.

But working genuine conversation and engagement in with scheduled posts is a great way to showcase your human side and build a following of raving fans.

Are you looking for help in this area? You can subscribe to receive my content and social media strategy tips via email or reach out for a 60-minute strategy session.

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genuine and trustworthy

Dollars Flow to the Genuine and Trustworthy

Passion is a way of life and business for me. One thing I’m very passionate about is being genuine and trustworthy as an entrepreneur.

Businesses run by honest, passionate people are the ones others want to work for and with. I only work with clients who are genuine and trustworthy and who want to make a difference in the lives of their clients or customers.

Beyond operating that way within a business, though, is marketing oneself the same way in order to move a business forward. This isn’t always the sexiest approach, because it can take time to plant roots as an unknown in a digital space, but it will ultimately bring the best return.

Once individuals know, like, and trust you, they will give you their business — it’s that simple. It’s important, however, to follow specific guidelines:

1. Make Sure You’re Marketing to the Right People

While it’s fantastic to generate engagement in the digital space, it’s meaningless if those you’re engaging with have zero desire to buy from you. Don’t fall into the trap of reaching out to an audience that ingests your content, but doesn’t need your services.

Here’s an example:

Let’s say you build websites and you’re trying to drum up business through social media. You publish tips and tricks as a way to generate engagement and, hopefully, business. The only problem is that your tips and tricks are attracting a do-it-yourself audience that loves your content, but doesn’t need your services.

If, on the other hand, you publish “10 questions to ask of your potential website developer,” you may attract a crowd looking for a website developer instead of looking to develop it themselves. And, going back to our original point, you will show that you are caring and trustworthy by helping this audience find the right fit.

2. Make Sure You’re GENERATING Enough Exposure

Just because you build it, doesn’t mean they will come. Producing fantastic content is only the first step. Next, you need to get that content in front of the right people by working with a social media specialist to dig into the nuances of each platform to get the most out of them.

Here are a few of my articles that may help:

Beyond that is a need for general SEO, or search engine optimization. Writing quality content is one thing; you also need to structure that content within your website so search engines read it and pull out relevant keywords.

One of my more popular posts is, “Stop Thinking SEO is Something You Should Save for a Rainy Day.” Basic SEO is simple and can make all the difference between potential clients finding you and finding someone else instead.

3. Make Sure You’re Saying Enough

As I mentioned before, I only work with awesome, genuine, and trustworthy clients. One of the things I do for them is connect the dots between who they are and what they’re broadcasting to the world.

Too often, amazing, talented entrepreneurs are selling themselves short by not conveying the incredible qualities they possess. These qualities are often referred to as “soft skills” and aren’t as outwardly valued in our culture as hard skills.

For consultants especially, these soft skills are everything. Even if your “it factor” has nothing to do with soft skills, the piece that will push people over the edge to want to hire you is often your engaging personality, ability to problem-solve, or genuine desire to want to help.

Make sure what makes you unique is being broadcast along with your deliverables.

Final Thoughts

Digital noise bombards potential clients and customers with endless messages and pitches. You want to be the person they turn to with their questions and — more importantly — their jobs.

Do that by conveying your genuine willingness to help and take care of their businesses, and you will be well on your way.

target audience

Don’t Worry About the Gurus … Just Do You

Back when I was still finding my way as an entrepreneur, I was between gigs and needed to bring in some cash. I opted for a multi-level marketing business, knowing that if I liked the products enough, I could sell them.

I was right, but felt pressure from the higher ups to recruit other sellers. It wasn’t in my DNA, though … I don’t like cold calls, gimmicks, lame pitches, etc. Against my better judgment, I tried it. What happened was exactly what I suspected: I pissed people off, didn’t recruit anyone, and felt the wrath of being something other than myself.

It taught me a valuable lesson: stay true to me, regardless of outside pressure.

Let Me Be Vulnerable For A Second …

One of my “superpowers” in business is networking. I’m good at it both online and in person. I love engaging with others and digging into what makes them tick. I’m passionate about what I do and that translates into my business conversations.

On the flip side of that is appealing to the masses – converting cold traffic into warm traffic into paying customers. I admit that I’ve allowed myself to fall into the same trap I fell into as a multi-level marketer: listening to the gurus instead of my gut.

I’ve heard some amazing advice: write practical tips my target audience is looking for, make my website about my audience instead of myself, “niche down” to appeal to my “avatar.” While I’ve generated traffic using these methods, my leads continue to come through referrals and through the two platforms I leverage my networking prowess: Twitter and LinkedIn.

The moral of the story? What makes me unique — networking and engagement — is what sells, not conforming to a set of practical tips.

Getting That Wake-Up Call

I owe my most recent wake-up call to a Freelance Transformation podcast episode with Khierstyn Ross. She confessed to host Matt Inglot that she hates pitching herself and that her business method is to network her ass off in the right places and establish herself as the go-to person for crowdfunding.

Like Khierstyn, I hate pitching to cold traffic, though I understand the value for those who are amazing at it (and in the right industry for it).

Khierstyn also talked about setting herself apart from the competition instead of blending in with all of the other Internet marketers. There are countless “social media managers” and “Internet marketers,” so good luck standing out from the crowd, she said.

That statement really resonated with me. I’d attempted to customize my website to my target audience, ultimately losing the part of my site that sells: me.

Embrace What You’re About

As entrepreneurs, it’s critical to embrace what makes us unique.

I love working with passionate people who want to make a difference in the world, whether it’s through education, fitness, health, or some other means. I have to work with people like this. Someone simply out to generate dollars at any and all costs is not my ideal client.

I dig into and ultimately embody the passion of my clients and work to convey it in the clearest possible way to those they want to help. It drives me as an entrepreneur to build those connections for my clients and see how they, in turn, can help others.

That’s what I’m passionate about.

Now — don’t get me wrong — I also nerd out over analytics and Facebook ads and breaking down the nuances of social media and content, but it’s not what sets me apart from other digital marketers.

What sets me apart is my drive to make a difference.

The Moral of the Story

So, why am I writing all this? I’m hoping my experience will help you dig deep into what sets you apart from the competition. I know from firsthand experience that the talents we so easily bestow upon others are hard to use with ourselves. We are too close to our own businesses.

Uncover what you are passionate about and what makes you unique — that is the reason people will want to work with you or hire you to be their consultant. It’s your “superpower” so to speak.

It doesn’t matter if you’re a digital marketing strategist, a fitness consultant, or an online coach: if you are someone passionate about helping others, it’s that passion that will result in growing your business.

Now it’s just a matter of conveying that passion in the right way.

Facebook pixel

What is the Facebook Pixel and Why Do You Need It?

I’ve had a number of entertaining conversations around the “Facebook pixel.” For those of us in digital marketing, it is an exciting snippet of code that unlocks a marketer’s dream of demographics, re-targeting, and warm leads.

For those of you who are not in digital marketing, conversation around the Facebook Pixel probably sounds like the teacher in Charlie Brown Christmas.

I’m going to do my best to explain the benefits of the Facebook pixel without getting too nerdy. I’ll probably have to get a little nerdy, though … I love this stuff!

1. Implementation

First thing’s first: how do you get this “Facebook pixel?”

It’s a short string of code that you paste into the header of your website. If you aren’t sure how to do that, whoever manages your website will understand.

You can also visit the Facebook Pixel help guide.

2. Facebook Pixel Function

What the pixel does is track everyone who visits your website so you can market to those people on Facebook. Think of it as going to a water park and getting your hand stamped. Once you’ve been to the water park, you’re branded. That’s what it’s like to visit a website that has the Facebook pixel implemented.

The beauty of this is that it allows you to specifically target those people with your Facebook ads. As a consultant, your highest likelihood of getting clients is by pitching people who already know you. Cold traffic probably isn’t going to convert.

If you are re-targeting people you know have been exposed to you already, however, you have a much greater chance at converting.

3. Facebook Pixel in Action

Okay, so you’ve got the pixel implemented and it’s tracking.

Now what?

Let’s walk through a one simple scenario of moving users from cold traffic to potential leads. We will assume you are starting from scratch with no audience to speak of.

Note: this is meant to be a conceptual walk through the process. I completely understand that you won’t understand the nuances of using the Facebook ads system!

Building An Audience Using Initial Tracking

  • Create a brand new audience comprised of the demographics and attributes you are targeting.
  • Create an ad using an article from your website. Don’t worry about including a call to action. At this point, you simply want people interested in your content to click through.
  • As the ad runs, those who click the link to your website will be tracked using the pixel.

Re-targeting with Your New Audience

  • Create a new audience using the traffic that clicked on your initial ad.
  • Now that you know you are marketing to people who have already been introduced to your brand, you should include a call to action such as collecting email addresses.
  • At that point, you can move over to email marketing with a larger ask.

Leveraging Existing Web Traffic

If you already have regular traffic on your website, you can use that to your advantage, too. The Facebook pixel will track users on your website even if they don’t come specifically from Facebook.

One option is to create an audience of users who have visited your website in the last 30 days. You could also target users who have been to a specific offer page with a harder sell because you know they must be interested in what you’re offering.

If you don’t want to send ads to those who have already claimed your offer, you can target people who have been to your offer page while excluding those who have reached your “Thank You” page.

Final Thoughts

There are so many possibilities when it comes to Facebook ads! Even if you aren’t ready to start, though, you should absolutely implement that pixel so you can start tracking. That way, when you’re ready to go full steam ahead, the data will be there waiting for you!

Looking to dig deeper into Facebook ads or social media strategy? Book a 60-minute strategy session!

warm leads

How to Warm Up Your Audience Before Pitching Your Services

I am a huge proponent of personalizing your message for your target audience, but this is even more important for consultants.

Consultants sell advice. It’s rare someone will pay a consultant for advice when they don’t know them from Adam. That’s why it’s critical to transition cold traffic — people who don’t know you — to warm leads before attempting to sell.

There are a number of ways to convert cold traffic into warm leads as a consultant.

Here is a three-step guide:

Step 1: Create Content

Since consultants are selling advice, content is critical because it showcases knowledge. Get into the heads of your target audience and come up with problems they need to solve.

It’s important to think basic for a number of reasons.

First, you will appeal to a broader audience when you start slow. As an expert in your field, it’s easy to take for granted what your audience doesn’t know.

Second, providing something simple allows your audience to test your advice and see tangible results. If what you’re suggesting is too complex, they will get lost in it and not see what your advice can do for them.

Noteworthy Advice

  • You may worry about giving away too much because then your audience won’t need to pay you. The opposite is true! When you give away your best stuff, people will flock to you for customized services.
  • Your content medium is just as important as your content. Again, get into the heads of those within your target audience and figure out how they best ingest content. It could be a blog, video, infographic, or podcast.

Step 2: Promote and Track

While it’s useful to have people reading, watching, or listening to your content because they’re getting to know you, it’s critical to track them.

I prefer a method recently mentioned in an interview between Jocelyn Sams of Flipped Lifestyle and Natalie Eckdahl of the BizChix Podcast: install a Facebook pixel on your website so you can target ads toward those who engage your content.

This method works twofold: first, it helps you grow your business Facebook page, which is difficult to do without paid advertising. Second, it leverages the most robust advertising medium available to reach your target audience.

You can promote your content on any medium — Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube — as long as traffic is coming to your website.

Step 3: Retarget to Warm LEADS

Your next step is to create a custom audience within Facebook.

  • Visit your audiences page within Facebook Business Manager.
  • Go to Create Audience — Custom Audience — Website Traffic.
  • From there, you can target anyone who has visited your website within a certain number of days.

This custom audience is valuable because we know they have been exposed to you and what you provide. Now you can target this audience with a bigger ask. Maybe you provide a resource and ask people to give their email address in exchange or go right to promoting your paid service.

It takes 6-8 touchpoints to generate a viable sales lead, depending on who you ask, so you may not get sales right away when you retarget to this audience.

The key is to understand exactly how you want people to get from knowing nothing about you to wanting to buy from you. This process — taking the audience from cold to warm — is only the beginning.

Final Thoughts

The number of steps it will take for cold traffic to buy from you depends on your content, audience, and service. It may be easier for a marketing consultant to convert than a fitness consultant, for example, since the latter is more personal.

The key is be organized, keep track of analytics, and refine until you get it right.

Twitter

Can Twitter Actually Help Your Business? It Probably Can

Twitter is a fantastic business tool misunderstood by a lot of successful entrepreneurs. Yes, it can seem silly to summarize what you’re doing in 140 characters or less, but the platform has the ability to generate leads and publicity for your business if you use it the proper way.

Here is a top-level look at ways you can use Twitter for good in your business:

Networking

During Social Media Success Summit, Amy Schmittauer described Twitter as a networking event. It is without a doubt exactly that. If you are in a B2B space, Twitter is a fantastic tool for you to use to get in front of the right people and talk shop or exchange ideas.

Take These Steps:

  1. Find the most relevant hashtags for your industry by visiting hashtagify.me and searching for keywords.
  2. Conduct a Twitter search with those hashtags and save the search to a private list you can easily access later.
  3. Spend 10-15 minutes each day looking through that list and engaging with others. You’ll soon learn who the key players are, uncover trending topics, and get to know others in your industry.
  4. Create another private list that includes key people to engage with. Spend 5-10 minutes each day reviewing their tweets. Give them shoutouts and retweets out of the goodness of your heart … it will come back to you!

How Do You Create A List on Twitter?

  1. Log into your Twitter account on a website browser.
  2. Click on your avatar in the upper right corner of the screen.
  3. Select “Lists” from the dropdown menu.
  4. On the right, select “Create New List.”
  5. Name your list and add a description if you’d like.
  6. Set your list to “Private” so others on Twitter won’t see it.
  7. When you find an account you’d like to add to your list, go to the account’s landing page and click the wheel icon. Select “Add or remove from lists” and check the box next to your new list.
  8. To view Tweets from accounts in your list, repeat steps 1-3 and then select the list you’d like to view. Tweets from those in that list will populate your screen.

Media Relations

Twitter is a news blotter, which means it’s prime territory for generating media coverage. Spending time in the platform each day will keep you up to speed on trending topics, helping you pitch to outlets you’d like to be featured in.

Take These Steps:

  1. Brainstorm all of the media outlets you’d like to be featured in.
  2. Conduct a search for each of their Twitter platforms and save to a list. To go one step further, find the media members who report on your industry within those outlets and find them on Twitter. Add their accounts to the list as well.
  3. Review their Tweets each day to see what stories they like to report on. Engage their content without an agenda so you learn more about them and they see you.
  4. By the time you’re ready to pitch, they will recognize you and be more likely to consider your story.

Lead Generation

Twitter can also be a great place to generate leads. By searching for relevant hashtags or questions, you can help your target audience with no strings attached. That is the key: don’t go into Twitter, guns ablaze, hard selling people.

Take These Steps:

  1. Search for questions pertaining to your specialty. If, for example, you’re a website builder who specializes in WordPress sites, you would search for troubleshooting questions.
  2. When you find a question, publicly reply with the answer.
  3. If the individual replies with a thank you, respond that you are happy to help and then direct them to your website for additional resources. Don’t try to sell them anything!
  4. Save that person to a list that includes potential leads.
  5. Spend 10-15 minutes each day engaging with your lead list. This will keep you in the forefront of their minds so they will reach out should they need paid services. If the opportunity presents itself down the line, pitch your paid services, but do so when there is a clear need.

Honorable Mentions

  • LinkedIn Positioning: Twitter offers an opportunity to get in front of those who curate LinkedIn Pulse. Tag “@LinkedInEditors” with the hashtag “#tips” along with links to your LinkedIn Publisher posts.
  • Trending Topics: Use Twitter as an idea generator for content. Whether it’s topics being most covered or an abundance of the same questions, you can directly address the needs of your target audience by engaging within the platform.

Don’t Forget …

  • Make sure you have a complete bio with a relevant hashtags, a link to your most relevant landing page, and a call to action.
  • Pin a relevant Tweet to the top of your account so visitors who check out your profile will see your best content first.
  • Take a look at Twitter analytics to see who is following you, your most popular Tweets, and more.

Looking to dig even deeper into your social media strategy? Book a 60-minute strategy session!

target audience

Get to Know Your Target Audience’s Behavior for Social Media Success

Social media is incredibly simple. All you have to do is sign up for an account, type in your message, and hit send. Customers or clients will flock, right?

Wrong.

One of the biggest misconceptions about social media is its simplicity. The fact that your 13-year-old nephew knows how to navigate Facebook leads you to believe you should be able to make it work for your business without batting an eyelash. Unfortunately, that’s where a lot of business owners get tripped up.

Just because you have a successful, six-figure business off of social media, doesn’t mean it will be an automatic success on social media.

Here are some important questions to ask yourself if you’re struggling to get your business humming on social media:

Where Is Your Target Audience Spending its Time?

When you’re launching your business, it’s tempting to think of the key social media players — Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest — and believe you have to have a presence on each of them. If your target audience isn’t there, though, you won’t get much traction.

It’s also important to know why they’re spending their time there. If you’re targeting school teachers, for example, you might immediately think of Pinterest as a platform you should invest in. If you’re targeting them because you offer professional development courses, however, LinkedIn or Twitter may actually be better options.

You can’t just think of where your target audience is hanging out, you must also consider why.

How Will Your Clients or Customers Find You?

Map out your customer’s or client’s frame of mind to best understand where you should be focusing your attention.

Let’s go back to our teacher example. You offer professional development courses for teachers. You’ve been putting your efforts into Pinterest with no luck, so you do a little digging. It turns out your target audience is on Pinterest … but they’re using the platform to find lesson plan ideas and DIY projects.

What should you do?

  1. Change the approach: Since your target audience likes DIY projects, what if you created DIY professional development? You could offer printouts or forms they could fill out themselves, then link to additional information (i.e. course materials) on your website.
  2. Change the platform: Maybe Pinterest isn’t the right platform for what you offer, even though your target audience is there. Shift focus to a platform that fosters networking and professional development like Twitter or LinkedIn.
  3. Change the audience: The audience you typically go after may not respond on Pinterest, but perhaps a different audience on Pinterest will. Maybe school administrators use Pinterest to find professional development materials for their teachers.

How does Your Target Audience communicate?

Just because something works on a billboard doesn’t mean it will work on Facebook or Twitter. Each social media platform exists to fill a specific communication need.

I may spend time on Twitter while I’m watching a TV show. Facebook is where I share family photos and engage within communities I’m a part of. I enjoy YouTube to watch hysterical spoof videos. Pinterest is where I find recipes.

Your audience may spend time on each of these platforms for entirely different reasons. It’s important to get inside the heads of your avatar and understand why they enjoy Facebook, Snapchat, or LinkedIn.

That’s the key to understanding how you should be communicating.

How Does the Platform Work?

Each social media platform has it’s own tips and tricks.

  • If you’re posting to Facebook, you better be aware of the dreaded algorithm.
  • Incorporate relevant hashtags on Twitter (you can research on hashtagify.me).
  • LinkedIn prefers longer posts within it’s publisher.
  • Instagram only allows one dynamic link for each account.
  • The list goes on and on …

Final Thoughts

You may take a look at this list and decide it isn’t worth the trouble – you’d rather hire someone. If that’s the case, reach out to me and we can schedule a discovery call — I’d be happy to do the heavy lifting for you!

I am also gauging interest for 60-minute social media strategy sessions! If that’s something you’re interested in, please let me know!

influencer marketing

How to Leverage Influencer Marketing to Grow Your Brand

Any online promotional strategy should include an influencer marketing piece.

What is influencer marketing?

Influencer marketing is a type of marketing that focuses on using key leaders to drive your brand’s message to the larger market. Rather than marketing directly to a large group of consumers, you instead inspire / hire / pay influencers to get out the word for you. – Tap Influencer

I personally recommend that you focus on the organic side of this strategy. As a successful business owner, you have an audience that can provide something to the influencer, so paying or hiring someone isn’t necessary. The key is finding a mutual benefit between the two of you.

A Case Study Metaphor: Fitness Guru

Let’s say you are a fitness guru, building your business around online consultations. You have found success through referrals and have modest followings on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. You’d like to expand your online reach as a way to automate your lead generation process.

You’ve believe influencer marketing can help you achieve this goal. Where do you start? There are a number of parameters to keep in mind when determining who you will reach out to, when, and how.

Who

Who will you reach out to? There are a few rules of thumb when considering the influencers you’re going to engage with as part of your influencer marketing strategy.

  1. Choose a non-competitor. Yes, your competitors will be the most relevant to your brand, but you don’t want to open that can of worms. Not only may you be perceived as trying to steal audience members from your competitors, you’re shifting the attention of your audience to someone else who offers your services.
  2. Choose a mid-level influencer. Don’t reach so high that your effort gets lost in a sea of tags and shoutouts. “Internet famous” people are inundated with messages and yours will easily get lost. There are exceptions to this, though, that we will get into another time.
  3. Choose a related industry professional. It’s important that the person you choose can benefit from your audience and vice versa. While there are situations in which you will simply post something and pray an influencer throws you a bone, it’s ideal to choose someone who will appreciate the additional traffic you are providing him or her.

When

Influencer marketing can happen anytime, but basing it around a particular article or event will generate the best results.

When someone in your field publishes an article, engages in an interview, or holds an event, he or she is looking to expand business reach. By giving a shoutout to that person in light of that content or event, you are becoming a part of their promotional strategy.

They will appreciate you recognizing their hard work and endorsing it as something others would benefit from.

How

How do you implement an influencer marketing strategy? You can write a blog on your website that mentions and links to the influencer, offer a shoutout on social media, or create a video that mentions the person or business.

The key is promoting what you do on a social media platform your influencer is a part of. Here are the best platforms for influencer marketing, ranked best to least best:

  1. Twitter. I LOVE Twitter for influencer marketing. You don’t have to get through any red tape to get to the person or brand you are engaging with and the benefit can be instant. If the brand you are engaging with retweets what you post, you’ve already expanded your reach. If you are engaging around a particular event, make sure you use that event’s hashtag.
  2. LinkedIn. Since LinkedIn is a B2B platform, you are going to get a lot of bang for your buck when you tag someone else within the news feed. Mention someone within an original blog you write and then post it along with a tag. You can also share content from an influencer on your timeline and give it a little endorsement while tagging the person or brand. This will expand your reach, but it will also nudge someone you are trying to woo into becoming a client or customer.
  3. Instagram. You can repost someone’s photo on Instagram, comment, or share. If you have a big, relevant following, reposting with their handle will go a long way. If you don’t know how to repost within Instagram, check out repostapp.
  4. Facebook. The best way to gain traction on Facebook is to share someone else’s post and tag their page when you do. This most taps into the “good karma” category. It’s a good strategy if you’re looking to gain this person or brand as a lead for your business because you’re starting out the relationship by giving them something for nothing.

Finishing Our Case Study

Now that we’ve gone through all of that, let’s finish our case study. Our fitness guru is looking to expand reach to automate lead generation. How might she tap into influencer marketing to do that?

  • Find complementary services. Fitness goes hand-in-hand with diet and nutrition. While our guru may offer services around diet plans, she can share recipes from healthy eating brands,  articles written about clean eating, or other fitness gurus that work in a different niche. For example, if our fitness guru specializes in yoga, she could share the work of a weightlifter. For everything she shares, she would tag the handle of the brand.
  • Tap into challenges. Twitter and Instagram are great platforms to find people engaging in a particular activity because of the use of hashtags. Research the top hashtags for training for a 5K or marathon and comment on the posts of those people. During the race, use the event hashtag to offer encouragement to those participating and give a shoutout to the face facilitator.
  • Engage the stars. Once a strong enough following is built (at least 1,000 followers on each platform), our fitness guru can work to engage in conversation with some of the stars in her industry. Comment on their articles, compliment their business, and express admiration!
  • Engage the media. A great influencer marketing strategy on Twitter is to engage media that covers your industry. Our guru can retweet articles and reply to tweets to compliment content they’ve created (she’ll want to reference the content so they know she actually read it). Once she’s built a rapport with those media members, she can start pitching them for her own stories.

Final Thoughts

Well, there you have it, and there is plenty more where that came from! While these are great tips that apply to any business, digging into the customization of each brand and each target will open up even more possibilities.

How have you tapped into influencer marketing? What has it done for your business?

repurpose content

How to Repurpose Content for Your Business

When you’re running a successful business, taking time to generate content is difficult enough without trying to create multiple forms of content.

What should you create? Live Facebook video? A blog article? A photo? Where should you post it? It’s already overwhelming and you haven’t even determined what you’re going to say.

I, personally, love content and the many ways it can be used, which is why I’m sharing a few ideas for how you can repurpose content to be relevant across multiple platforms.

Facebook LIVE

I just did my first-ever LIVE Facebook video since I preach it’s importance to my clients, but had never done one myself.

The reason Facebook LIVE is a medium you want to invest in for your business is because Facebook is trying to grow that aspect of its platform. When you go live, it notifies everyone on your page that you’re live, drawing attention to your content.

After the video is over, it converts to on demand content with a higher weight (e.g. higher level of importance) than video that was never live.

But hey, you’re not done!

  1. First thing’s first, write a blog post around the video. You can transcribe some of the things you said and quote them within your blog or you can write on a related topic.
  2. Embed your video within your blog and extend the life of your video through cross-promotion.
  3. Make 5–10 key quotes tweets on Twitter and link to the blog. This will push traffic to the blog and, ultimately, to Facebook.

Podcast Interviews

If you are regularly featured on podcasts, you have a wealth of content at your fingertips and you may not even recognize it! Podcasts can be anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour. They frequently contain in-depth conversation between you and a reputable podcaster.

What should you do with that once you podcast is released?

      1. Thank your interviewer! Wherever your podcast interviewer has an account, thank that person by tagging them and linking to the interview on their website.
      2. Transcribe the interview. For longer podcasts, this may seem really daunting, but the content is gold. You have someone focused on you for an hour … you want to repurpose that content as much as possible!
      3. Write blog posts using those transcripts. You may be able to come up with 2–3 posts from one podcast. Embed the audio from the podcast within your blog posts and tag the person who owns the podcast every time you promote your blogs on social media.

These actions accomplish a few things. You are …

      1. Getting the most out of your content!
      2. Showcasing your expertise to your audience by broadcasting that you were featured on someone else’s podcast.
      3. Showing other podcasters how creative you are with your content and how much publicity they will get by having you on the show.

Curated Content

Curated content is a great way to spread the word about your business while networking with top influencers. If you have specific writers, podcasters, or industry professionals you follow and admire, you can cite their content within a blog for your website.

Let’s say you are a podcaster. Another podcaster comes out with a great article, “The 10 best ways to book your featured guests.” You, however, have had success in other areas this person didn’t mention.

You can give a shoutout to the original blogger by summarizing what he or she said and linking back to the original post. Then you can add your additional tips.

This gives you a brand new piece of content while you did little work and you are networking with another influencer in your space.

Final Thoughts

      • Be creative with your content! When you take the time to put together an amazing video or be a guest on someone’s podcast, get the very most you can out of the time you spent.
      • When you give love to others within your industry, it will come back around! Your brand will be mentioned on social media, you’ll be invited to appear on other podcasts. Trust me, it happens.
      • Be on the lookout for great content by others! You may be able to leverage it for yourself by responding to or enhancing it … and you give someone else a shoutout at the same time! It’s all about networking.

Do these ideas seem fantastic but you just don’t have the time to make them happen? Reach out for a discovery call. I love repurposing content for my clients!

Facebook

Let’s Take the Mystery out of Facebook So It Can Help Your Business

There are countless ways Facebook can help your business, but even the most intelligent entrepreneurs struggle to crack its code.

While it’s simple to use, it can feel like you’re shouting to no one, pushing out post after post to little fanfare. You may even find yourself questioning your own skills.

This can’t be that difficult … can it?

The answer is yes and no. Facebook is a powerful tool you can leverage for your business, but it can easily become a nuisance if you don’t understand how it works.

Here’s the key: give Facebook what it wants, and you’ll see a return.

1. Facebook Wants Your Money

It’s harsh, but it’s true.

Facebook is a robust advertising asset because it collects everything. Do you need to promote your content to women who recently had a baby? Someone who just changed jobs? A person afflicted with Lyme disease?

You can target all of that within the ad manager and that’s the route the platform wants you to take. Organic content — or content left to perform without paying to promote it — can work, but it has become increasingly difficult for businesses just starting out.

Facebook has made it tough for businesses to build an engaged audience without paid advertising, so it should be expected when you’re earning your first 1,000 followers.

2. Facebook Wants You to Engage its Users

Speaking of an engaged audience, that’s what Facebook wants you to have. The user experience is extremely important to the brand, which is why shares, comments, and likes will increase exposure of your content to your followers.

Have you ever logged onto the platform and seen a post with “Jane and Joe recently liked this post …” at the top? That’s a post receiving a lot of likes, comments, and shares, so Facebook believes you’ll want to see it, too.

It’s how it weights published content: when a post gets a lot of attention right away, it jumps to the top of the news feed. Create content your followers want to engage with and you’ll generate more exposure for your brand.

3. Facebook Wants You to Record Videos

That’s right, Facebook wants to be the No. 1 source for online video, and it’s well on its way. In fact, it predicts that the news feed will contain only video within the next five years.

If Facebook wants it’s platform to be video-focused, it means it’s going to help things along by favoring video posts. This past March, Facebook changed it’s algorithm to give preference to live video vs. on demand. It’s why you will get a notification if a page you follow is going live.

Here’s what this means for you: get on the video train, or it’s going to leave without you. Whether you’re talking to your audience, conducting a Q&A, or posting live from an event you’re attending, you will increase your traction by dabbling in video.

Additional tips

  • If you have a large following on YouTube, you may be posting YouTube links to your Facebook page. What you may not know is that YouTube links won’t do well within the news feed because Facebook wants you to natively upload them to their platform.
  • Are you open to putting a bit of money into Facebook ads? Make sure you have a clear focus when you do. Boosting random posts for additional clicks may be fun, but it’s wasting money if you don’t have a specific objective.
  • When you’re earning those first 1,000 followers, cross-promote your page as much as possible. Since Facebook allows you to embed its content, you can upload a video and then include it in a blog post. It’s a win-win: you give Facebook what it wants (video) and you promote your page to your blog audience!

I could dig so much deeper into each of these areas! Do you find these tips are too simple or too complex? Let me know which of these is most helpful to you by commenting below!